Movie Crews Move into Scottdale for Project

By Polacek, Karl | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 28, 2014 | Go to article overview

Movie Crews Move into Scottdale for Project


Polacek, Karl, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Parents, actors and members of a movie production team gathered on Friday at Greystone Manor in Scottdale to take care of paperwork and to have still photos taken and costumes fitted before filming begins Saturday.

Greystone Manor, at the intersection of Chestnut and Mulberry streets, is the location for the movie, "Gore Orphanage."

It was the first home H.C. Frick built after he left West Overton in the 19th century as he developed his coal and coke empire. Later, Frick found it necessary to build a bigger mansion in Pittsburgh.

The movie is based on an urban legend that claims that in Vermilion, Ohio, in the 1800s a fire destroyed an orphanage, killing many of the children, whose ghosts now haunt the ruins. Most of the movie will be set in rural Ohio in the 1930s.

The movie is a joint venture of Cody Knotts, producer, and Emily Lapisardi, director, who were recently married and live in Uniontown.

Most of the cast members are children. The youngest are 8 years old, which posed special problems because of Pennsylvania's child labor laws.

Kirk Holman of California, Pa., who has been friends with Knotts for many years, said he is helping because he has a great deal of respect for the talent of Knotts and Lapisardi. Holman's son, Charles, 31, is handling the paperwork involved, including making sure all the work permits for the child actors are in order.

Charles Holman said the recently revised Pennsylvania Child Labor Act is strict. For example, children ages 6 to 8 may not work more than 8 hours in a 24-hour day and may not work past 12:30 a.m. on a non-school day. They also may not begin work before 5 a.m., and 12 hours must elapse between the time of dismissal and the time of call on the following day.

"The work rules are stiff, but were needed," Charles Holman said.

Kirk Holman said the governor's office has been helping the film's officials keep in line with the laws and regulations.

There were many children to check on Friday morning.

Ray Wade, the still photographer who also acts as the second cameraman and gaffer, has worked with Knotts on four films.

Emma Smith, 9, of South Park, was waiting to have her picture taken under the watchful eyes of her mother, Dawn. Smith is playing the part of orphan Nellie. She was ready to go on Friday, if not suffering just a bit from the itchiness of the skirt of her costume on the very warm day.

Brandon Mangin, 8, of Knotts' hometown of Taylors-town, Washington County, was calm as he awaited his turn in front of the camera. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Movie Crews Move into Scottdale for Project
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.