Traffic Signals Meant to Be Obeyed ; State Laws Are Clear on Rules When Going through Intersections

By Mulkins, Phil | Tulsa World (Tulsa, OK), February 7, 2012 | Go to article overview

Traffic Signals Meant to Be Obeyed ; State Laws Are Clear on Rules When Going through Intersections


Mulkins, Phil, Tulsa World (Tulsa, OK)


Every day I drive to work I see at least one motorist running a red light or stop sign. Everybody's in a rush to get to work on time or home from work but this is no excuse to risk the lives of others who prefer to obey the traffic laws.

The Tulsa traffic code's Title 37, Chapter 6, "Moving regulations and traffic control devices" - tulsaworld.com/TulsaMunicode - is very specific on what behavior behind the wheel is unacceptable around "traffic control devices."

Red lights: Sections 606.A through 609 say "vehicles facing green traffic lights must go right, left or straight unless posted signs instruct otherwise. They must yield to pedestrians." Drivers with green signals "may continue with safety even after yellow or red signals appear." Those facing steady yellow signals, while not yet in the intersection, are guilty of "improperly crossing an intersection while facing a yellow traffic-control signal light" and handed a $150 citation. Those facing red lights before entering intersections must "remain standing until the green signal is shown alone." Passing through the intersection while the light is red makes them guilty of violating Section 606.C: "failure to stop before entering an intersection while facing a red traffic-control signal light," a $200 infraction.

Stop signs: Sections 610.A through 611 say drivers must "completely stop" their vehicles "before proceeding on through intersections where official stop signs have been erected." They must stop "all forward movement in the proper lane and behind the extending curb line of the intersecting street" and in a position having "complete visibility to the right and left of the intersection." They must "yield right-of-way to all other vehicles already in motion in the intersection or so close as to constitute an immediate hazard. …

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