Report Extols Tulsa-Area Economy ; the Oklahoma City Area Also Compares Well in a Survey of the World's Top 300 Metropolitan Areas

By Winslow, Laurie | Tulsa World (Tulsa, OK), November 3, 2012 | Go to article overview

Report Extols Tulsa-Area Economy ; the Oklahoma City Area Also Compares Well in a Survey of the World's Top 300 Metropolitan Areas


Winslow, Laurie, Tulsa World (Tulsa, OK)


Tulsa and Oklahoma City ranked in the second-strongest group of 60 metropolitan areas worldwide for their economic performance in a Brookings Institution report released Friday.

The think tank's Global MetroMonitor for 2012 put Tulsa at 106th out of 300 metropolitan areas worldwide, and 14th out 76 U.S. metros. Oklahoma City ranked 71st internationally and sixth in the nation.

The Global MetroMonitor analyzes 2011-2012 data on gross domestic product per capita and employment change, among other factors, for the world's 300 largest metropolitan economies.

"The global outlook for this year is rather grim, with a generalized slowdown in developing and developed countries, but we do see some pockets of growth at the metro level," said Emilia Istrate, lead author of the Global MetroMonitor.

The 300 largest metro areas included in the study account for nearly half of the 2012 global economy but only 19 percent of the world's population.

The Tulsa and Oklahoma City rankings improved from last year. Based on recalculations, Tulsa ranked No. 253 last year and was in the bottom performing group of the world's 300 metros, while Oklahoma City ranked 158th.

Tulsa has had a relatively good year with an employment growth forecast of 2.2 percent, up from 0.3 percent last year, Istrate said. The area's gross domestic product, or GDP, per capita is projected to grow 0.7 percent for the year, up from zero last year.

Tulsa has partially recovered from the Great Recession, and it's outperforming the United States on job growth but lags on GDP per capita change, the report states.

Tulsa has a forecast 2012 GDP of roughly $43 billion and a GDP per capita of $44,900. …

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