University of Oklahoma College of Medicine Alumni Association to Present Annual Awards

By Gilmore, Joan | THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 24, 2007 | Go to article overview

University of Oklahoma College of Medicine Alumni Association to Present Annual Awards


Gilmore, Joan, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Each year, the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine Alumni Association presents awards recognizing Oklahomans who have provided outstanding medical and community service. The black-tie event - Evening of Excellence - benefits the Association's Research Fund.

This year's dinner, 23rd in a series, is scheduled at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. Honorees will be David W. Parke II and University of Oklahoma President David Boren and his wife, Molly Boren.

Reservations are $200 per person.

In the previous 22 years, the dinner has provided almost $1 million, which is presented in grants to physicians and researchers at the Oklahoma Health Center. The Evening of Excellence is a joint venture of the Health Center and the Alumni Association and recognizes outstanding leaders from the business and medical communities.

Parke is chair of the Department of Ophthalmology and holds the Edward L. Gaylord Endowed Chair at the center. He also is president and CEO of the Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, one of the nation's largest facilities devoted solely to research, clinical care and education in ophthalmology and vision science.

A graduate of Stanford University and Baylor College of Medicine, Parke completed residency training at Baylor College of Medicine, serving as chief resident.

Parke is a fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and received its Honor Award in 1989 and its Senior Achievement Award in 1998.

His wife, Julie T. Parke, is interim chair of the Department of Neurology and holder of the Chair in Child Neurology at the Oklahoma Health Center. They have three children - Will, a fourth-year medical student at Baylor College of Medicine; Laura, an analyst for Corporate Executive Board; and Lindsey, a junior at Wake Forest University.

David Boren became OU's 13th president in 1994. Since then, the College of Medicine campus alone has added four major new buildings, research funding has soared, scholarship endowments reached $10 million and the number of endowed faculty positions climbed to nearly 120.

Before becoming OU president, Boren was a state legislator, governor of Oklahoma and three-term U.S. senator.

Boren graduated from Yale University in 1963 and was selected as a Rhodes Scholar, receiving a master's degree from Oxford University in 1965. He received a law degree from the OU College of Law in 1968.

He and Molly Shi Boren, a teacher, lawyer and judge, were married in 1978. She received her master's degree in English in 1971 and her law degree in 1974 from OU. The next year, she became one of the youngest judges in Oklahoma history when she was appointed special district judge for Pontotoc County.

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University of Oklahoma College of Medicine Alumni Association to Present Annual Awards
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