`Computer Worms' Undermine China Piracy Talks

By Poole, Teresa | The Independent (London, England), January 18, 1995 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

`Computer Worms' Undermine China Piracy Talks


Poole, Teresa, The Independent (London, England)


The H W Electronic Corporation operates from a modest one-room office in a converted warehouse in Zhongguancun Street, Peking's "Electronics Street", an area which is home to most of the city's dian nao chong, or "computer worms".

The office is equipped with all that is necessary for its business: one desk, two chairs, and a desktop computer. The manager, who uses the name Mr Wan, is an obliging fellow: "Whatever software packages you need, I can get them for you at reasonable prices," he says, profering a printed list of what is available. It includes the newly developed "Chinese Star", a Chinese-language word-processing system; the authorised version retails for more than 2,000 yuan (pounds 50), but Mr Wan's boxed set of discs and manuals can be purchased for 200 yuan. Bring your own floppy disc, and Mr Wan will make a copy of your chosen software for 15 yuan.

A few miles away, under the cloud of a looming trade war, United States and Chinese negotiators will today reopen talks over copyright protection in China. Piracy of software, films, CDs and audio-visual products will be top of the agenda. It is less than three weeks before the 4 February deadline when the US is threatening massive trade sanctions over copyright abuse, and China is promising equally strong retaliation.

This time the US negotiating team includes trade representatives from the industries thatfeel most injured: Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Export Association of America; Jay Berman, president of the Recording Industry Association of America; and Robert Holleyman, president of the Business Software Alliance.

The grievances are many. A US trade official this week accused a state-owned company in Shenzhen of producing crates of laser discs of Walt Disney's The Lion King months before the hit movie was even released on videotape.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

`Computer Worms' Undermine China Piracy Talks
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?