Protecting the Welfare of China's Orphans

By Jinzhou, Hua | The Independent (London, England), January 9, 1996 | Go to article overview
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Protecting the Welfare of China's Orphans


Jinzhou, Hua, The Independent (London, England)


The Chinese Embassy in the UK deeply regrets the report of Human Rights Watch/Asia, which made groundless accusations against China.

China attaches great importance to the healthy development of children. It protects the legitimate rights and improves the welfare of children, especially those of orphans and the disabled, through legislative, judicial and administrative means. The Chinese government has been taking concrete measures to protect the rights of infants, including training of childcare personnel and providing material and financial resources.

Take the Shanghai Children's Welfare Institute, for example. At the end of 1994, the Shanghai Children's Welfare Institute had 402 orphans. It accepted 202 new orphans that year but 183 left the orphanage. Among them, five found their parents, 124 were adopted, 10 became employed and formed their own families, 36 shifted to other orphanages and eight died. At the end of 1995 the total in the orphanage stood at 517. During that year, 276 new orphans were accepted and 166 left. Among them, 139 were adopted, 17 were shifted to other orphanages and 10 died.

The majority of orphans in the Shanghai Orphanage were those who had lost their parents as a result of natural disasters or unexpected incidents, those who were mentally or physically retarded and unrecoverably disabled, and those who were abandoned by their parents. The orphanage also took temporary care of those children who lost their way because of their parents' carelessness.

Some babies were in a critical condition when they came to the orphanage, and some were about to die. The orphans were given prompt medical treatment.

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