First Choose Your MBA

By Schofield, Philip | The Independent (London, England), January 16, 1997 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

First Choose Your MBA


Schofield, Philip, The Independent (London, England)


A new accreditation scheme to control the quality of MBA programmes has been under discussion for more than a year. When business schools were few in number, the employer grapevine kept organisations informed about those MBA courses which were considered useful. Although the criteria varied and the ratings were subjective, these informal opinions were fairly reliable. However, as the number of business schools offering MBAs grew, it became increasingly difficult for employers and prospective students to sort the gold from the dross.

Since the first business schools were established in the United States over a century ago, several magazines - including Fortune, Business Week and US News and World Report - have published surveys that rank the top 10 to 25 MBA programmes. But rankings based upon the subjective opinion of a sample of senior executives have a number of weaknesses.

Business leaders who are alumni of business schools tend to vote for their Alma Mater. This in turn favours the biggest and oldest business schools, which have the largest numbers of alumni. Moreover, because a school's ranking can affect both its student recruitment and the value of its consultancy assignments, public relations activity is intense and can affect the rankings. MBA courses did not reach Britain until 1965 and in 1983 there were only 20. Growth has since been explosive, and well over 100 UK "business schools" of varying standards now offer MBAs. In Britain a more objective series of rating business schools was established by the Association of MBAs (Amba). This relied on the voluntary inspection and accreditation of individual MBA courses (not the business schools themselves) against strict criteria. So far 33 of the UK's hundred or more business schools offering MBAs have had courses accredited. As the reputation of the scheme has grown, 15 business schools in France, Spain, Switzerland, The Netherlands and Italy have also sought and earned accreditation. Several more UK and European business schools are currently seeking accreditation for their programmes. Each business school hoping for accreditation is visited by a team of up to six assessors. Once accredited, schools are inspected every seven years. Amba requires a school to have its own identity and facilities within the institution of which it is a part. It must be autonomous. The faculty should have at least 40 staff, three-quarters of whom are dedicated to the business school itself, to ensure strength in depth and adequate student contact. The staff should also be credible in terms of their academic qualifications, their ability to teach business at postgraduate level, the quality of their research and the extent of their business contacts and consultancy activities. The school is also expected to invest in developing its staff. Admission standards for students must be high, and based both on work experience and academic attainments. The student body must also be large enough to form an "intellectually critical mass". The curriculum must provide students with a core knowledge of such business topics as finance, marketing, quantitative methods, human resource management, information systems, and strategy. These core subjects should be supported by a range of "electives".

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

First Choose Your MBA
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?