Network: De Luca's Peripheral Vision Logitech's New CEO Is Determined Change the Image of `the Company That Makes Mice'. by Cliff Joseph

By Joseph, Cliff | The Independent (London, England), September 21, 1998 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Network: De Luca's Peripheral Vision Logitech's New CEO Is Determined Change the Image of `the Company That Makes Mice'. by Cliff Joseph


Joseph, Cliff, The Independent (London, England)


THE PRESS release describes Guerrino De Luca as "one of the most enigmatic CEOs in the industry". But that's just public realtions- speak for "dark, Italian, and he doesn't come to the UK very often". He certainly doesn't look enigmatic posed with a plastic steering wheel clipped on top of a Victorian tea-table that probably isn't used to this sort of abuse.

The steering wheel - titled the WingMan Formula Force Racing System - is the latest product from Logitech, which is perhaps Europe's most successful manufacturer of computer peripherals. The firm has its marketing headquarters in California, but it was founded and still has its research and development operation in Switzerland, which, De Luca notes happily, "has some advantages for tax".

De Luca was appointed president and the chief executive of Logitech six months ago and was visiting the UK to launch the WingMan and several other products at the recent ECTS trade show in London. To most computer owners, Logitech is just "the company that makes mice", which is like saying Microsoft is just a company that makes software. Logitech makes 45 million mice yearly for the world's top 20 computer manufacturers, and if you've just bought one of Apple's new iMacs then your trendy green mouse was designed by Apple but built by Logitech.

Its mouse and trackball business is worth about $300m a year, and an assortment of keyboards, joysticks and other peripherals bring Logitech's annual business to more than $400m. Logitech, however, has saturated the mouse market and De Luca's job is to figure out how to keep the firm growing. He may not look comfortable sitting in front of his WingMan steering wheel, but he does have a track record of helping small companies get bigger.

De Luca began his career at Olivetti, where he worked his way through the ranks to become director of networking products. It was during his nine years at Apple Computer, however, that he joined the industry's big league. He led Apple's European operations through a period of strong growth in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Then he was appointed chief executive of Claris, Apple's independent software division.

"I had a great time at Claris steering a medium-sized company to world- class level," he beams, still not looking very enigmatic. He was certainly a success at Claris. While Apple began to head downhill in the mid-Nineties, De Luca turned the previously loss-making Claris into one of the world's top-10 software companies. His success at Claris left him untainted by the problems in the rest of Apple, and when the then-Apple chief executive Gil Amelio took the axe to his management team De Luca was appointed to the key position of executive vice-president for worldwide marketing.

At our last meeting, just over a year ago, De Luca looked like a man heading for the top spot at Apple.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Network: De Luca's Peripheral Vision Logitech's New CEO Is Determined Change the Image of `the Company That Makes Mice'. by Cliff Joseph
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?