Books: Time-Bombs Behind the Scenes at the Museum This Way for the Hall of Presidential Wives: Scott Bradfield Enjoys His American History with a Subversive Twist; the Smithsonian Institution by Gore Vidal Little, Brown, Pounds 16.99, 260pp

By Bradfield, Scott | The Independent (London, England), October 24, 1998 | Go to article overview
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Books: Time-Bombs Behind the Scenes at the Museum This Way for the Hall of Presidential Wives: Scott Bradfield Enjoys His American History with a Subversive Twist; the Smithsonian Institution by Gore Vidal Little, Brown, Pounds 16.99, 260pp


Bradfield, Scott, The Independent (London, England)


ACCORDING TO Gore Vidal's inventive new novel, American history may have nothing to do with what people remember. Rather, it consists of all those things they have never been told. Vidal's protagonist is 13-year-old T., a Kafkaesque math-sciences whizz-kid who has been summoned to strange doings at the Smithsonian. Arriving after- hours on Easter Sunday, 1939, he discovers that the guards have been transformed into wax statues, the exhibition dummies have taken on a life of their own, and the hokey dioramas of Midwest Plains Indians and Old West Mining Towns are now big enough to get lost in. Even weirder, the mysterious "Chief" has developed this new-fangled gizmo.

Turn it one way, and time advances; turn it the other, and time retreats. In other words, the Smithsonian no longer puts on cheap shows for punters. It manufactures reality, takes it out for test spins, and tinkers with the damn thing until it gets it right.

"Your Smithsonian concept is a sort of metaphor," declares Chief Yellow Sky Bird, just before trying to turn the errant T. into an especially spicy form of bouillabaisse. It is "yet another world imposed on ours and invisible to us". But in Vidal's world, history does not just colonise the heathen, but subdues the masses as well. As T. journeys deeper into the Smithsonian's maze-like structure, he finds himself eavesdropping on what America's secret masters tell each other behind closed doors: Annex more territory. Build more weapons. And whenever the public grows restless, start another war to keep them distracted. In other words, history may be a lie. But it is a lie which can accomplish certain purposes. Outside the Smithsonian, the clouds of the Second World War gather on schedule. Inside, T. and his fellow scientists hurry to design the atomic bomb, and save their country from all those things that are supposed to happen.

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Books: Time-Bombs Behind the Scenes at the Museum This Way for the Hall of Presidential Wives: Scott Bradfield Enjoys His American History with a Subversive Twist; the Smithsonian Institution by Gore Vidal Little, Brown, Pounds 16.99, 260pp
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