Obituary: Professor Joseph Sandler

By Tuckett, David | The Independent (London, England), October 12, 1998 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Obituary: Professor Joseph Sandler


Tuckett, David, The Independent (London, England)


JOSEPH SANDLER was a leading figure of modern psychoanalysis and one of the most productive and creative psychoanalytic theoreticians of the past 50 years. His extraordinary clarity and scholarship has led to a reformulation of psychoanalytic ideas and was one of the major contributions to the sea change which the profession experienced after the Second World War. There have been barriers between high-quality clinically based psychoanalytic thought and rigorous thinking in university life. Sandler broke them down.

Over 30 years Sandler held professorships in the Netherlands, Israel and Britain. He was appointed to the Chair of Psychoanalysis Applied to Medicine at Leiden University in 1968, where he worked for 11 years before taking up the post of Sigmund Freud Professor at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. In 1984 he became the first incumbent of the Freud Memorial Chair of Psychoanalysis at University College London, where he remained active as Emeritus Professor following his retirement in 1992.

His brilliance was evident from the start. Born in Cape Town in 1927, he matriculated at 15 and received his first degree in psychology from the University of Cape Town in 1945. After obtaining his Master's the following year, he came to England to pursue his doctoral studies with Sir Cyril Burt at University College and worked as a clinical psychologist at the Maudsley Hospital. His early interest was in statistical psychology and in 1957 he was elected Fellow of both the Institute of Statisticians and the British Psychological Society. Like many brilliant individuals, he was able to pursue numerous goals more or less simultaneously. He obtained his PhD in 1950 and immediately embarked on medical training at University College Hospital. He was also in psychoanalytic training, becoming a qualified analyst of the British Psycho-Analytical Society in 1952 the age of 25. His talents as a psychologist were recognised and he became the youngest Editor of the British Journal of Medical Psychology, a post he held from 1956 to 1962 and from 1968 to 1974. Joseph Sandler was one of the greatest Freudian psychoanalysts. His intellectual contribution was immense. He, perhaps more than any other single individual, was responsible for reformulating psychoanalytic theory from its outmoded language of 19th-century biology to a conceptual framework consistent with our current understanding of how the mind works. His scientific research programme stands as a monument to clear thinking, simplicity and creativity. In 44 books and 200 papers spanning 50 years of scientific work, he offered psychoanalysts a new frame of reference bridging their experience of the clinical process with theoretical ideas. From his position in the unusually diverse psychoanalytical culture within the British Psychoanalysts Society, Sandler was uniquely placed to understand some of the most creative minds in the discipline - Anna Freud, Melanie Klein, Donald Winnicott, Wilfred Bion - and to create ideas that have been embraced by psychoanalysts of very different theoretical orientations. His work is amongst the most often cited in the psychoanalytic literature and even those who do not acknowledge their intellectual indebtedness to him implicitly make use of his ideas.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Obituary: Professor Joseph Sandler
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?