Media: They'll Be Laughing in the Cells ITV Had High Hopes for Bad Girls. but Prisoners and Critics Alike Are C Alling the Jail Drama Unrealistic and Ridiculous. Is It a Criminal Waste of Meticulous Research? by Angela Devlin

By Devlin, Angela | The Independent (London, England), June 22, 1999 | Go to article overview
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Media: They'll Be Laughing in the Cells ITV Had High Hopes for Bad Girls. but Prisoners and Critics Alike Are C Alling the Jail Drama Unrealistic and Ridiculous. Is It a Criminal Waste of Meticulous Research? by Angela Devlin


Devlin, Angela, The Independent (London, England)


Bad Girls, ITV's new women's prison drama, has been panned by most critics. "A criminal waste of time", complained The Guardian, and The Mirror's Tony Purnell was equally dismissive: "The Aussie soap Prisoner: Cell Block H was always considered a bit of a joke but it is quality drama compared with Bad Girls. They should put producer Brian Park behind bars and throw away the key!"

I first met the series devisers, script executive Anne McManus and writer Maureen Chadwick, in January this year at the AGM of Women in Prison, a support group for female prisoners. I write books about prisons, and I was impressed at the extent of the writers' knowledge about women's incarceration - and by the fact that here they were, on a cold winter's night, listening to a small group of campaigners. Most scriptwriters hire researchers to do their homework, but Chadwick and McManus spent months visiting women's prisons and interviewing inmates and staff. They consulted ex-prisoners working for Women in Prison, and spoke to organisations like NACRO and the Prison Officers' Association. They took advice from a retired female governor and hired an ex-prison officer as on-set adviser.

"Anything that's recently been produced about women's prisons, we've got it and we've read it," says McManus. "We amassed a large library of research material which we made available to the cast." The library included three of my own books, particularly Invisible Women, about female prison conditions. Maureen Chadwick wrote three of the ten episodes. She feels Bad Girls has a clear moral purpose: "It costs pounds 500 a week to keep a woman in prison, but until the BBC broadcast Jailbirds, the people's medium had done little to inform us about what we're all funding, and whether it works. Unless they film in secret, documentary makers need Home Office approval and the co-operation of the prison authorities. They can't access the reality of drug- dealing, sexual exploitation, bullying and neglect." McManus agrees: "We're wearing our liberal hearts on our sleeves and every line of the drama screams that out. The drama was written because we were so shocked by what we saw in women's prisons." I met up with the writers again and we had a number of telephone conversations about storylines. In mid-February I visited the Bad Girls set in Docklands. The replica jail, the biggest standing set ever built in Britain, cost millions to produce. But why, I asked production designer Mike Oxley, was HMP Larkhall based on a male prison? The only female jail with landings and low-ceilinged cells was Risley women's unit, which has closed. "We visited Winchester jail, but the women's unit there is modern, not like a prison at all," explains Oxley. "We needed to create something like viewers would imagine a prison to be so we based the set on elements of Winchester men's prison and on the decommissioned Oxford jail - all the outside scenes are shot there." The costumes looked wrong too: Debra Stephenson, playing prison bully Shell Dockley, was wearing a leopardskin top and a tiny mini- skirt: "When I went to Winchester prison the women were all in jogging pants and sweatshirts but I suppose you need dramatic licence," said Stephenson. "The character I play is pure evil. I spoke to one of the prisoners and she said, `Please don't make us too nasty, because it really isn't like that.

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Media: They'll Be Laughing in the Cells ITV Had High Hopes for Bad Girls. but Prisoners and Critics Alike Are C Alling the Jail Drama Unrealistic and Ridiculous. Is It a Criminal Waste of Meticulous Research? by Angela Devlin
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