New Body to Back UK Film Industry

By Lister, David | The Independent (London, England), May 2, 1999 | Go to article overview
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New Body to Back UK Film Industry


Lister, David, The Independent (London, England)


CHRIS SMITH, the Secretary of State for Culture, yesterday announced that the Film Council, which will replace all the other film quangos, will begin work next April.

His announcement came at the same time as the Arts Council confirmed that no film made with National Lottery funds has made a profit.

Speaking in Cannes, Mr Smith said: "The Film Council will develop a coherent strategy for film culture, the development of the film industry and the encouragement of inward investment, and determine the allocation of resources between them. "Over the next three years total investment of public and lottery money in films is expected to reach pounds 150m, at least pounds 145m of which will be channelled through the Film Council." The money for the Film Council is not new money. Rather it is money that will be transferred from the other film quangos. But the Film Council will replace the Arts Council as the conduit for lottery money for new films from April. Charles Denton, the Arts Council's lottery film panel chairman, confirmed in Cannes yesterday that no lottery financed film had made a profit. He said: "No lottery-funded film that I know of has so far recouped more than 100 per cent of its costs." Lottery-funded films include Wilde, Hilary and Jackie, Hideous Kinky, and the new release An Ideal Husband. One of the lottery franchises, DNA Films - run by Duncan Kenworthy, producer of Four Weddings and a Funeral, and Andrew Macdonald, producer of Trainspotting - has not made a film in more than a year with its lottery money, pounds 29m of which has been sitting in the bank. They said yesterday that they now have films ready for development. Challenged about the fact that no lottery film had made a profit and that one of three lottery franchises, Pathe Pictures, was French- owned, Mr Denton said that lottery money for films had "improved the cultural life of the country". In the past four years the Arts Council has awarded pounds 67m to 79 feature films and pounds 95m to three film franchises to produce films. Some 32 of the films have so far been released in British cinemas. Six have failed to get any cinema release. The rest are in production. Earlier, Mr Smith announced that film producers making films in Britain had agreed to give up to pounds 1.5m a year in voluntary contributions towards training film technicians.

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New Body to Back UK Film Industry
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