Cricket: Atherton's Advantage Squandered

By Brenkley, Stephen | The Independent (London, England), November 21, 1999 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Cricket: Atherton's Advantage Squandered


Brenkley, Stephen, The Independent (London, England)


IT WAS all progressing so swimmingly. This is an unfamiliar state of affairs where England are concerned which alone made it more pleasant. Still, those who took the advice to enjoy it while it lasted made the right decision. The third day of the final warm-up match before the serious business of Thursday had begun on a sad note but it had been cosy thereafter.

England had carved out a significant first-innings lead of 102 during which two of the all-rounders on which the balance of the side and the fate of the Test series could depend each took three wickets. Gavin Hamilton had found some smart away-swingers in his armoury and Andrew Flintoff, enjoying his first bowl of the tour, had responded with that panache which should empty a few bars before filling them again later over the next few years. The side had then built on these efforts to extend their advantage over the Combined Gauteng/Northerns provincial team to 190 with all their second- innings wickets still in hand.

Mark Butcher, who perhaps needed to convince himself of his readiness, looked as composed as he has done all tour. Michael Atherton was in his pomp once more, pulling and square driving adeptly. It was almost enough to compensate for the bad news about the fast bowler Dean Headley. A scan on his injured back had revealed a hot spot and possible stress fracture which will need a period of rest of eight to 12 weeks. Although a second opinion is being taken in the next two days, the likelihood is that he will fly home this week, his place on the tour to be taken by Chris Silverwood, who has already arrived here in a temporary back-up capacity.

This is unwelcome news for a whole-hearted player, not least because until the problem arose after he had bowled 10 balls in the tour's opening match Headley had never had a sore back in his bowling career. It only confirms that sooner or later the stresses exerted by the discipline catch up with its exponents.

Despite that bad news, a lead of nearly 200 was all England could have hoped for in this match. This was, after all, the Sixth Test according to the South African media, so they wanted to give England a severe examination. It then all went horribly wrong for the tourists.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Cricket: Atherton's Advantage Squandered
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?