We Need Interviewers to Be Rude to Politicians ; Podium: Menzies Campbell: From a Lecture by the Liberal Democrat MP to the BBC Visegrad Forum and the British Embassy in Budapest

By Campbell, Menzies | The Independent (London, England), December 22, 1999 | Go to article overview
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We Need Interviewers to Be Rude to Politicians ; Podium: Menzies Campbell: From a Lecture by the Liberal Democrat MP to the BBC Visegrad Forum and the British Embassy in Budapest


Campbell, Menzies, The Independent (London, England)


DEMOCRACY IS a frail plant. It will not flourish unless it is sustained and nourished. But, like most plants, it flourishes best in daylight, and robust independent political broadcasting is the daylight in which democracy can best be established and sustained.

Whenever political broadcasting becomes deferential or subject to external control, its contribution and its independence are reduced. The broadcaster's responsibility is to ask all of the questions that the viewer or listener would ask if he or she was in the same room. The broadcasting system must be self-confident enough to make mistakes, mature enough to admit them when it does, and brave enough to take the same risk again.

This is not to say that political broadcasting should be routinely rude or motivated by malice. Individuals are entitled to respect, but this should be related, not to position or access to power, but to frankness and honesty. The interviewer needs to be brave, bold and persistent. And the interviewee should in turn be honest, frank and informative. Sometimes rudeness will be justified where there is deliberate evasion or deception. The viewer and listener expects, and is entitled to, no less.

Are these the values of a mature democracy with a long- established tradition of independent political broadcasting? Of course they are, but to those who have emerged blinking into the daylight - like the prisoners in Fidelio - they should be as much part of the new democracies as they are of the old.

For state-controlled broadcasting has invariably been part of the apparatus of totalitarianism and an instrument of repression designed to hide and shield, and not to illuminate and inform. Control broadcasting and you control the political agenda. Where do revolutionaries go first after they've captured or killed the head of state? Sometimes they go to the airport, but mostly to the radio and television stations. Control the flow of information and you control the population.

These principles are equally applicable where the revolution is peaceful and the outcome benign.

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We Need Interviewers to Be Rude to Politicians ; Podium: Menzies Campbell: From a Lecture by the Liberal Democrat MP to the BBC Visegrad Forum and the British Embassy in Budapest
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