The Business World: Delivery Is the Key to the Cut-Throat E-World ; If You Can Get Your Delivery Right, the Potential Benefits Are Enormous

By McRae, Hamish | The Independent (London, England), December 8, 1999 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

The Business World: Delivery Is the Key to the Cut-Throat E-World ; If You Can Get Your Delivery Right, the Potential Benefits Are Enormous


McRae, Hamish, The Independent (London, England)


YES, BUT how do you deliver? Amid the headlong rush towards e- commercing everything from car sales to banking, the little matter of delivery looms larger and larger. But while a vast amount of attention goes into organising the electronic side of things, getting the product or service to the consumer lags behind. And that is wonderful news - because it gives an opportunity for wise companies to shine.

The electronic side still leaves plenty to improve on. Many of us have had tried a transaction on the Internet - perhaps to book an airline seat - only to find that after 20 minutes' pecking at the keyboard to no effect you end up picking up the phone, talking to a human being and booking in two minutes. But, given time, that will be fixed, because it is just a question of buying adequate hardware and appropriate software. If companies are prepared to make the necessary investment, they will provide an efficient, seamless service.

But if some aspect of a service is easy, it is also impossible to gain a competitive advantage. That comes in the tough areas, and in e-commerce the tough area is delivery. As the legendary management guru, Peter Drucker, puts it in an article in The Economist's The World in 2000: "Delivery will become the one area in which a business can truly distinguish itself."

Not all delivery. It is easiest to divide retail e-commerce into four main areas: where the product or service can be delivered electronically, such as software or online information; where it is relatively easy to deliver, say, books; where physical delivery is inevitably quite clunky (a new car?); and where delivery is a complex interaction between buyer and seller, not just a one-shot sale.

More of the last in a moment. Consider the first three. As more and more homes have high-speed Internet access, the range of products that can be delivered this way will surge. Video rental stores will still exist because many people will still want to walk out to choose one, but more and more people will order it down the wire.

If goods can be delivered easily by post or courier, there is a simple rule to ensure success. Amazon.com has managed to dominate book retailing because it was a first mover, but it retained that dominance because it has an excellent delivery record.

Much the same applies to Dell computers, which, as I discovered the other day, has a very efficient system for tracking past sales - it managed to fax over a VAT receipt that I needed within 30 minutes, while the VAT inspector was still looking at the books. Whether delivery is managed by the seller or bought in on contract is irrelevant.

The customer does not know or care where the product is coming from, and certainly has no interest in how the delivery is managed. But it has to be good. Trouble again, though, is that it is hard to achieve much of a comparative advantage over other players. Being good is too easy for that. The third area, where delivery is inherently difficult, does hold out the prospect of retaining an advantage.

Take some examples.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

The Business World: Delivery Is the Key to the Cut-Throat E-World ; If You Can Get Your Delivery Right, the Potential Benefits Are Enormous
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?