`I WANT TO LIVE NEAR WHERE I WORK. I'M NOT ASKING FOR THE WORLD' ; London's Sky-High Property Prices Are a Problem for Many Workers. but Lucy Hodges Discovers That Low Salaries Mean the City's Universities and Colleges Face a Growing Crisis in Recruiting and Retaining Staff

By Hodges, Lucy | The Independent (London, England), March 1, 2001 | Go to article overview
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`I WANT TO LIVE NEAR WHERE I WORK. I'M NOT ASKING FOR THE WORLD' ; London's Sky-High Property Prices Are a Problem for Many Workers. but Lucy Hodges Discovers That Low Salaries Mean the City's Universities and Colleges Face a Growing Crisis in Recruiting and Retaining Staff


Hodges, Lucy, The Independent (London, England)


ANNA DAVIES, 30, is on the bottom rung of the lecturing ladder at King's College London. With almost 10 years of higher education behind her, she teaches geography, earning just under pounds 21,000 for her pains. Her first degree was from Cambridge; she then did a Masters in town planning at Oxford Brookes followed by a PhD at Cambridge. At the end she was about pounds 6,000 in debt.

"I am in my second year as a lecturer and am renting a flat with another lecturer in Hornsey Road, a less-affluent part of Islington. I pay pounds 550 a month for my share of the flat. We had both wanted to live on our own but couldn't afford the rent.

"For me, it was an option between living close in and cycling to work or living further out and paying more for transport. But I'm considering moving to Cambridge to be with my partner. That's the only way I can afford to get on to the property ladder and buy somewhere - by combining my salary with his.

"My partner has a job which pays a bit more than mine. And there are small, terraced houses available in Cambridge which I think we could afford.

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`I WANT TO LIVE NEAR WHERE I WORK. I'M NOT ASKING FOR THE WORLD' ; London's Sky-High Property Prices Are a Problem for Many Workers. but Lucy Hodges Discovers That Low Salaries Mean the City's Universities and Colleges Face a Growing Crisis in Recruiting and Retaining Staff
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