American Correctional Association Defines Correct Terms

By Carter, Kim | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 8, 1986 | Go to article overview

American Correctional Association Defines Correct Terms


Carter, Kim, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The American Correctional Association has defined what terms we may and may not use when referring to members of the profession.

According to the association, inappropriate language detracts from the professionalism of the corrections field. The association released a report recently barring certain inappropriate terms.

The news media often uses the word "guard" incorrectly, the association said, to describe the professional line staff officers who operate correctional institutions. Correctional officers is a moreacceptable term.

Two years ago, the association unanimously adopted a resolution to bar the use of the word guard when writing or talking about correctional officers.

The association is seeking the support of the media, government officials and the public in upholding their resolution to ensure that only accurate terms are used to refer to men and women operating jails, prisons and other correctional and detention facilities, the report said. . .

- The Kerr Foundation Inc. trustees have approved a grant of $1.1 million to the Oklahoma City University School of Law, according to Stuart Strasner, OCU law dean.

The grant will consist of gifts of $115,000 per year for 10 years, as specified by Robert S. Kerr Jr., president of the Kerr Foundation. Other trustees are Mrs. Robert S. Kerr Jr.; Gerald P. Marshall, chairman and chief executive officer of the Bank of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City and Elmer Staats of Washington, D.C.

The funds will go to the support of the law school in providing for scholarships, faculty support and faculty development funds. These will specifically include a chair in constitutional law, special courses, professional travel and research. . .

- The American Bar Association calendar for the rest of February includes seminars on government fraud and corporate law.

%E "Procurement Fraud Prosecutions and Debarments," Feb. 20 and 21, is sponsored by the divison for professional education and will be held at the Hyatt Regency in Washington D.C.

%E "National Institute on the Dynamics of Corporate Control: Evolving Legal Sandards Applied to the Frontiers of Cororate Strategy" is scheduled for Feb. 27 and 28 at the Hyatt on Union Square,San Francisco, Calif.

The institute is sponsored by the section of corporation banking and business law.

The program will examine the legal and economic issues in the corporate takeover arena and will include an analysis of the defensive measures and applications of business doctrines involved in takeover contests. …

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