Television Admakers Worrying about Those `Fidgety' Viewers / Shivering at New Technology

THE JOURNAL RECORD, October 1, 1986 | Go to article overview

Television Admakers Worrying about Those `Fidgety' Viewers / Shivering at New Technology


NEW YORK (AP) - When was the last time you sat down and watched a network television show from start to finish without changing channels?

Admakers say it's happening less often and they blame declining program quality, the proliferation of cable and independent stations and technological innovations such as video cassette recorders and remote control.

Their real concern is you won't be there for their commercial.

Technology alone has spawned a lexicon that sends shivers through creative departments up and down Madison Avenue.

Words like zapping. Zipping. And, thanks to a new study by the advertising agency J. Walter Thompson USA, flipping.

They describe the latest defenses viewers have against commercials and programs that bother or bore them.

Zapping is what happens when you change the channel to avoid a commercial. Zipping requires the assistance of a VCR, and describes what occurs when you use the ""fast-forward'' control to slip pasta recorded commercial.

But the Thompson study, based on 1,881 telephone interviews with adults 18 and older, said only 9 percent of television viewers admitted to zapping commercials. It said zipping occurs in about 18 percent of all households with VCRs.

More prevalent than either of these, the study said, is flipping: switching channels at any time.

It said 34 percent of those surveyed change channels during a show for various reasons, ranging from those who switch simply because they get bored to others who switch almost constantly ""samplingbits and pieces of different programs.''

The study said it found flipping occured in roughly the same proportion in all types of programming - feature films, dramas, sitcoms, adventures, mysteries and sports - and in both daytime and prime evening viewing periods.

And it predicted flipping likely would increase as more viewers got cable television and more sets were equipped with remote control.

The development has significant implications for admakers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Television Admakers Worrying about Those `Fidgety' Viewers / Shivering at New Technology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.