Coca-Cola Sets out to Prove It's a Part of American Life in 1987/new Advertising Campaign Revealed

THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 27, 1987 | Go to article overview

Coca-Cola Sets out to Prove It's a Part of American Life in 1987/new Advertising Campaign Revealed


ORLANDO, Fla. (SWN) - ``When Coca-Cola is part of your life, you can't beat the feeling.''

That's the singular message conveyed in the new 1987 advertising campaign for Coca-Cola revealed Thursday by Coca-Cola USA.

Edwin R. Mellett, senior vice president, The Coca-Cola Co., and president, Coca-Cola USA, unveiled the highly creative umbrella campaign born from consumer emotion and involvement with the Coca-Cola name.

``The campaign for our mother lode, brand Coca-Cola,'' Mellett said, ``came from the American people, the consumers of Coca-Cola.

```A part of your life' - that's what consumers tell us Coke is,'' he added. ``Coca-Cola is an integral, natural, important part of their lives...no other branded product can say that as Coca-Cola can...it's one that's wrapped up in family values, youthful fun, friendship, your first date, patriotic spirit - everything that we have made it represent for 100 years.''

Mellett and John C. Reid, senior vice president - Marketing, Coca-Cola USA, introduced mainstream advertising strongly tied to the new theme. Campaigns for the company's leading beverages in the lemon-lime and orange flavor categories also were previewed at a national meeting of Coca-Cola bottlers and company officials. All new advertising campaigns include commercials produced especially for the black and Hispanic markets.

To set the stage for the company's advertising, Mellett reviewed a banner year in Coca-Cola USA performance in 1986 that included:

- Growth in the sugar cola market five times greater than the industry;

- Growth in the diet segment accounting for more than 60 percent of the industry's growth in that category;

- Leadership for the first time in the lemon-lime category, in which Sprite grew 5 percent, while the rest of the industry declined 7 percent;

- More than 7-percent growth in total volume, accounting for more than 60 percent of total industry growth.

Five products from The Coca-Cola Company last year captured half of the top 10 spots in U.S. soft drink sales. Backed by the strongest sales year in Coca-Cola USA history, Coca-Cola classic in 1986 became the nation's top-selling soft drink, claiming a nearly 19 share, according to industry authorities. Other Coca-Cola USA products in the top 10 were diet Coke (No. 3), Sprite (No. 6), Coke (No. 9) and cherry Coke (No. 10).

That impressive news was just the opening chapter in a 1986 ``Total Momentum'' Bottler report heavy with success stories for the Coca-Cola trademark and other brands from Coca-Cola USA.

The company increased its corporate market share to more than 39 percent, an all-time high and more than nine share points ahead of its closest competitor.

In an incredible sales year, Coca-Cola USA emerged with category leaders in colas and lemon-lime, the two largest flavor segments: Coca-Cola classic in sugar colas and diet Coke in one-calorie colas; and Sprite in lemon-lime, overtaking its major competition for the first time.

Those accomplishments were complemented, Mellett said, by the announcement that advertising for Coke - featuring new wave video superstar Max Headroom - was selected the top commercial campaign of 1986 by Video Storyboard Tests Inc.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Coca-Cola Sets out to Prove It's a Part of American Life in 1987/new Advertising Campaign Revealed
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.