Business, Medicine, Computers, Engineering Provide Top Jobs / Says Labor Report

By Schmid, Randolph E. | THE JOURNAL RECORD, July 4, 1987 | Go to article overview

Business, Medicine, Computers, Engineering Provide Top Jobs / Says Labor Report


Schmid, Randolph E., THE JOURNAL RECORD


Engineering, computers,business services and health professions continue to provide the nation's top job prospects, according to a report from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Those areas have the best long-term career outlook for young people planning ahead, reports Neil Rosenthal, chief of the department's Occupational Outlook Division.

``The service industries are the ones that are growing, especially the business services such as accounting firms and legal services,'' Rosenthal said in a telephone interview with the .

Indeed, overall service businesses have grown faster than goods-producing operations in recent years as rising incomes and living standards have helped produce demand for service workers.

And at the same time, while imported goods have captured a share of the market for American-made products, the same has not occurred in the service business field to any great extent.

A Labor Department analysis of expected trends, in fact, calls for as many as nine out of 10 new jobs between now and 1995 to be in the service sector of the economy, rather than in manufacturing or other goods producing activities.

Service occupations cover a wide range of employment, of course, ranging from the lawyers and accountants mentioned by Rosenthal to cleaning people, security guards, fire, police and corrections officers, bartenders and waiters and waitresses.

Health workers were also selected for special mention by Rosenthal, a category that covers not just doctors and dentists but also nurses, health technicians, dietitians, pharmacists and therapists.

``Employment in most of the health occupations is expected to grow faster than the average as the population growth - especially in the number of older people - increases the demand for health care,'' reported the Labor Department analysis.

Registered nurses, nursing aides and orderlies are expected to be among the leading new job categories. Strong growth is also expected for physician's assistants, medical record technicians and medical assistants.

Automation, however, may reduce some of the growth among laboratory technologists.

Computer systems analysts and engineers are also expected to see strong job growth, Rosenthal noted.

These groups will benefit from increased military spending and from growing automation in many areas of the economy, the department said. And general research is expected to offer more jobs for scientists. …

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