U.S. Needs Educational Programs on Foreign Languages, Cultures

By Lesher, Richard L. | THE JOURNAL RECORD, August 1, 1987 | Go to article overview

U.S. Needs Educational Programs on Foreign Languages, Cultures


Lesher, Richard L., THE JOURNAL RECORD


WASHINGTON - At the first meeting of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in Washington, D.C., 75 years ago, our first president, Harry A. Wheeler, called upon business to study the languages and cultures of foreign countries, especially those of Asia.

"We assume that we can send a salesman to Japan or China or South America on a flying trip as we would send him into Montana or Colorado," he said. "Never was there a greater fallacy.

"The creditable representative of our industries in foreign markets must speak the language, know the customs and live with the people if he expects to enjoy patronage in proportion to that given other nations."

I can't help but wonder how much better off we would be today had Wheeler's sound advice been heeded. There can be no question our massive trade deficit is at least partly due to our ignorance of foreign languages and cultures, which greatly inhibits our ability to market U.S. products and services abroad.

Those Americans who do study foreign languages in high school and college tend to concentrate upon European tongues, such as Spanish, French and German. Very few indeed take the time and trouble to learn Asian languages.

By contrast, Japanese business has long recognized the need to be thoroughly familiar with the English language and the customs and attitudes of the American people.

The Japanese educational system is closely attuned to the demands of Japanese business and sends forth every year fresh cadres of young people who can speak and write English and are thus highly capable of adapting Japanese products to the needs of our marketplace.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Needs Educational Programs on Foreign Languages, Cultures
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.