Burglary Plague Transforms Home Security Industry into a $5 Billion-a-Year Business

By Leckey, Andrew A. | THE JOURNAL RECORD, October 1, 1987 | Go to article overview

Burglary Plague Transforms Home Security Industry into a $5 Billion-a-Year Business


Leckey, Andrew A., THE JOURNAL RECORD


Burglary, unfortunately, is ``in'' in our modern society. An estimated one of every 14 U.S. households will suffer a break-in of some kind this year.

Such worrisome statistics have rapidly transformed the home security industry into a $5 billion-a-year business, with homeowners typically spending $1,000 and up for each home system.

Because more than 12,000 security companies are competing in this industry that's expanding at a 15-percent annual clip, it's hardly surprising that some are less than reputable.

``The alarm industry still doesn't have a lot of hard-and-fast standards, so be aware that you'll run into some undesirable participants with no ethics,'' warned Lee Jones, president of Support Services Group of San Marcos, Calif., a security consulting firm.

He recommends checking first with your local police department to find out if the security company you're considering for a home system has a good track record in your community for installing quality systems.

``Ask the alarm company for a customer list and select out of that list five of its customers to ask how well their system operates,'' advised Robert A. Bonifas, president of the National Burglar and Fire Alarm Association, a national trade group. ``Be warned that some companies come on with an advertising splash, make big money and then disappear to another area within five years.''

The basic installation is a closed-circuit loop system consisting of magnetic contacts on doors and windows. An intrusion sets off an alarm or bell heard inside and outside the home. There's also a choice of added interior protection special screens; pressure mats; photoelectric beams; and ultrasonic, infrared and microwave systems.

There are also more elaborate - and more expensive - central reporting alarms that send a signal either to an alarm company central station or the local police department. Many companies will install a combination of the buzzer system and the central alarm. In addition, a fire alarm system is often installed along with the burglar alarm.

``The most modern security systems that use microcomputers are more geared to the resident than in the past, when you could only turn systems on or off,'' said Steven I. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Burglary Plague Transforms Home Security Industry into a $5 Billion-a-Year Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.