Young Executives Want Benefits Other Than Pay

By Belt, Joy Reed | THE JOURNAL RECORD, November 3, 1988 | Go to article overview

Young Executives Want Benefits Other Than Pay


Belt, Joy Reed, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The new breed of young corporate executive requires management to rethink everything about its employment practices from fringe benefits to corporate structure.

Employers report that new college graduates entering the workforce for the first time are hard working, but that their attention is focused more on leisure activities. They are only mildly interested in such common elements of the compensation package as retirement; instead, they want to know about the company fitness center and whether it fields a softball team.

Salary is important to them, but less so than job satisfaction. It is not uncommon for a candidate to turn down a higher paying job for one which is more enjoyable, either because of the usefulness of the work itself or the pleasantness of the environment and coworkers.

Employers may sniff and say that these youngsters are going to have to adapt themselves to existing corporate culture if they expect to get jobs. But - and this is a very important but - the 1987 crop of college graduates was noticeably smaller than previous graduating classes. The 1988 class will be even smaller.

Companies which were used to picking and choosing from among many candidates for every position are going to have to reajust their thinking. And that means making the changes necessary to become attractive to these first-time managers.

QUESTION: I worked construction for 12 years and worked steadily due to hard work and a good reputation. In May 1986 I became very ill and had to have four blood clots removed from my leg, but gangrene set in in my foot, and in November I lost my leg above the knee. I became a client of the state rehabilitation department. Vocational school was mentioned to me, and I had picked out several courses that I would be interested in, but this did not come about, and the counselor wants me to think about an "under the table" job so that I can keep my Social Security benefits. I don't know where I can start looking for a job. I know that if "under that table" wages are paid, workman's compensation and taxes are kind of forgotten. I'm very mobile with my prosthesis and want to go to work now, but my health is not good because of diabetes.

ANSWER: You certainly have had a difficult time of it, and it is abaout time for your luck to change. I think the first thing you need is a new counselor who will get you into a vocational school where you can learn a marketable skill. You are correct in thinking that in "under the table" jobs taxes are "kind of forgotten"; and Social Security taxes are among those that are forgotten. Therefore, if you want to maintain your Social Security benefits, these are the last kinds of jobs you want to consider. …

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Young Executives Want Benefits Other Than Pay
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