Drop in Lawsuits Hurts State Courts

By Judy Gibbs, Ap | THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 27, 1989 | Go to article overview

Drop in Lawsuits Hurts State Courts


Judy Gibbs, Ap, THE JOURNAL RECORD


By Judy Gibbs Oklahoma courts are hurting financially because fewer lawsuits are being filed, the courts administrator said Tuesday.

The number of civil lawsuits filed declined about 8.5 percent in fiscal year 1988, and other case filings were down from 17 percent for small claims to 1 percent for felonies, said Howard Conyers, director of the Administrative Office of the Courts.

The loss in revenue to Oklahoma courts already stands at about $700,000 this fiscal year, and that is expected to rise when court clerks finish submitting second quarter reports, said Jack Wampler, director of finance for the courts.

``I don't see the trend reversing,'' Wampler said, adding that if it continues, the court system will almost certainly have to ask the Legislature for a supplemental appropriation. He declined to speculate on how much additional money the courts would need.

Conyers told a House Appropriations subcommitee the financial problem is so severe that without additional funds, ``making payroll could be a real problem for us.'' The budget for district courts is about 98 percent personnel costs, he said.

The general court filing fee is $62, with a $35 fee for small claims. Those fees, along with fines and forfeitures go into the State Judicial Fund, one of two sources of revenue for Oklahoma courts. The other source is the appropriation made each year by the Legislature.

``If one side declines, the other has to pick it up, it's that simple,'' Conyers said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Drop in Lawsuits Hurts State Courts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.