Suggestion of Olympic Committee Turning Pro Develops into Report

By Anderson, Dave | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 24, 1989 | Go to article overview

Suggestion of Olympic Committee Turning Pro Develops into Report


Anderson, Dave, THE JOURNAL RECORD


With his usual bluster, George Steinbrenner has offended the purists who think the Olympic ideal still exists. The essence of his Olympic Overview report is that the United States Olympic Committee needs to turn pro.

But it's time those purists realized that the committee should relinquish its amateur standing.

For years, the joke at the Olympics has been that the only amateurs were the officials, especially U.S. Olympic Committee officials.

Now the Olympic Overview commission, headed by the New York Yankees' principal owner, has, in so many words, told that joke to Robert Helmick, the U.S. Olympic Committee president. And Helmick laughed. But the scary part is that Helmick remains in charge of implementing the critique.

If Helmick, a Des Moines, Iowa, attorney who was an Olympic water polo player, needed a 21-page report to realize what Olympic-watchers without portfolio had been saying for years, maybe he should put somebody else in charge.

Not Steinbrenner, however.

Judging by the Yankee principal owner's impulsive trading of Yankee farmhands, Steinbrenner might swap America's best speed-skating prospect to Norway for a ski-jumper, a biathlete, and a luger to be named later.

If the Olympic committee agrees with the report's suggestion that its marketing, fund-raising and public-relations offices be moved to New York from Colorado Springs, it needs to hire someone to be the boss of its New York operation.

The best possible choice would be Peter Ueberroth, the outgoing baseball commissioner who organized the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.

Now that the committee appears eager to turn pro, it needs to hire a pro. At a pro's salary.

Beginning April 1, Ueberroth will be at liberty. Anoint him as the U.S. Olympic commissioner. Let him market the U.S. Olympic program the way he marketed millions for the 1984 Olympics, the way he marketed more than a billion for baseball's television contracts.

According to the overview report, the committee might be threatened with ``financial disaster'' as early as 1992 unless its economics are reassessed.

But whenever money is mentioned, Olympic purists are offended. They still cherish the Olympic ideal that the important thing is not to win, but to take part, as proclaimed by the French baron, Pierre de Coubertin, who resurrected the Olympic movement nearly a century ago.

But the new Olympic baron, George Steinbrenner, understands the reality of today's Olympic movement, along with the reality that medals create economic support, especially from the corporate world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Suggestion of Olympic Committee Turning Pro Develops into Report
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.