New Job Opportunities Open Up for America's Disabled

By Porter, Sylvia | THE JOURNAL RECORD, August 22, 1990 | Go to article overview

New Job Opportunities Open Up for America's Disabled


Porter, Sylvia, THE JOURNAL RECORD


There's new help available if you are disabled or if you have a friend or family member with a disability. Job opportunities that never before existed are opening up.

The Americans With Disabilities Act that Congress passed last May aims to reduce discrimination in the workplace. Of the 43 million Americans with disabilities, two-thirds between the ages of 16 and 64 are unemployed. Many of them would like to work.

Getting jobs in industry or other organizations suddenly has become easier. But some disabled persons are taking matters into their own hands. They're becoming entrepreneurs.

Robert Flor lives in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Trained as a welder, he followed his trade for several years, often in situations and places detrimental to his health. Flor became allergic to many substances and, finally, couldn't work at all.

Some people in his situation would have been content to go on disability and live out their days. Not Rob Flor.

``I'm sensitive to chemicals - a new carpet, somebody cleaning a copy machine,'' he explained.

So, working at home where he could control his environment wasn't just desirable. It was necessity.

And he certainly wanted to work. He got help from the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation in Poughkeepsie. This agency exists to help people find what they can do and a way to do it. Flor took an interest in computer programming. After all - this can be done almost anywhere. Attending classes was sometimes too much. Still, he didn't give up.

His fortunes started to change when he became involved with a local computer bulletin board. On bulletin boards users can engage in conversations on their computers - and, most important, help each other with computer problems, general concerns and the travails of everyday life.

Flor was a natural here, and he found a great spport network - friends, some of whom he'd never met, who were eager for him to succeed.

Now, he's found a way to go into business for himself, in surroundings he chooses, and to continue to contribute to the world around him. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Job Opportunities Open Up for America's Disabled
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.