Northwestern's Business School Tops in Magazine Survey

THE JOURNAL RECORD, October 2, 1990 | Go to article overview

Northwestern's Business School Tops in Magazine Survey


Northwestern's Business School Tops in Magazine Survey NEW YORK - Northwestern University's business school placed first for the second consecutive year in a new survey by Business Week magazine.

In its Oct. 29 issue, the magazine said Northwestern's J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management in Evanston, Ill., received the highest rating from the 6,000 business school graduates and 322 corporate recruiters surveyed.

Following Northwestern at the top of the list were the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, Harvard University, the University of Chicago and Stanford University.

The graduates were asked to rate their schools on teaching, curriculum and placement, and the recruiters rated the graduates' skills.

Recruiters in the survey ranked Northwestern graduates highest in interpersonal skills and marketing, and third in general management.

Stanford graduates had the highest average starting salary of $79,135.

Rounding out the Business Week Top 10 were the business schools at Dartmouth University, University of Michigan, Columbia University, Carnegie Mellon University and University of California at Los Angeles.

They were followed by the business schools at Massachusettes Institute of Technology, followed by University of North Carolina, Duke University, University of Virginia and Indiana University.

Filling out the top 20 in the Business Week rankings were Cornell University, New York University, University of Texas, University of California at Berkeley and University of Rochester.

Cable Regulation Bill Dead, Backers Say WASHINGTON - Senate backers of a bill to regulate cable TV prices said Friday the compromise measure was dead for the year after they failed to move it to a floor vote.

The defeat marked the end of three weeks of private negotiations between Sens. Albert Gore, D-Tenn., and Tim Wirth, D-Colo., to soften language in the bill to prevent cable programmers from making exclusive contracts with cable system operators.

It also culminated a two-year effort to meld two dozen cable bills into a law that would address rising concerns about shoddy service and cable charges, which have risen 43 percent in the last three years. Cable fees were deregulated by Congress in 1984.

Gore and Wirth had reached a compromise they hoped would make the bill palatable to the White House, which has threatened all along to veto the measure.

But White House chief of staff John Sununu this week urged several Republican senators to place a ``hold'' on the bill to prevent its coming up for a floor vote, congressional and industry sources said.

Hartford Refutes Consumer Group Claims WASHINGTON - The ITT Hartford Insurance Group said Friday that the consumer group Public Citizen added up the figures wrong when it listed the Hartford among five major property and casualty insurance companies that could fail in the event of a recession.

Public Citizen, after a meeting here with officials of the insurance company, said it was checking into the allegation.

``Obviously if we made a mistake, we are going to say so,'' said Robert Dreyfuss, a spokesman for the organization, which is affiliated with consumer advocate Ralph Nader.

Public Citizen said Monday that the Hartford, Aetna, American International Group, Liberty Mutual and United States Fidelity & Guaranty each failed four of six tests that it used to measure vulnerability to insolvency.

The group said none of the companies was on the edge of insolvency but ``the underlying weakness in their financial condition is clearly evident. …

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