Expanded Dimensions Give Resumes Power

By Belt, Joy Reed | THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 29, 1991 | Go to article overview

Expanded Dimensions Give Resumes Power


Belt, Joy Reed, THE JOURNAL RECORD


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The power resume, which focuses on self-marketing, has added new dimensions to resumes of the past which tended to be all alike.

Most resumes started with personal information, which was followed by education degrees and certifications, a list of work experiences, organizational activities, honors, awards and references. Most were too wordy and too long, and they were dull, dull, dull.

Now, as people are changing companies and often careers several times in a lifetime, the competition for better jobs is intense. One of the most important tools in securing alternate employment is a resume that sells the individual rather than just providing information.

Resumes are designed to get you interviews, so you must sell yourself and your capabilities with a resume just as you would sell a product or a service in a brochure. That means concentrating on what you can do rather than just what you have done in the past. It often means focusing on talents and skills for a specific industry, company, or even a particular job and organizing your assets to cause the greatest impact.

The various techniques of preparing a resume have become so sophisticated that hundreds of books have been written about it. Several approaches are explained and illustrated in a recent book called Resumes That Mean Business by David R. Eyler, published by Random House. Eyler presents resumes modeled after major prototypes, including targeting to a particular type of job and ways to group skills and qualities in clusters for a particular type of work.

With the use of computers, fax machines and videotape, resumes also have become more sophisticated in the age of technology. Computers allow for the use of bold type, larger type and different type faces for emphasis, layout and style that help market assets, skills and achievements for particular purposes. Fax machines can be used for speed and impact, but something often is lost in presentation.

Videotaped resumes are being used to convey personality and communication skills in addition to the information of a printed resume. Video resumes are especially effective if you are pursuing sales or media industry positions.

Most employers believe a poorly typed, dull and wordy resume usually reflects a sloppy, ill-prepared applicant and often is dismissed by a personnel manager.

It's not the information but how it is presented that can make the difference in resumes for today's business environment.

QUESTION: My wife and I both work, and like so many couples today, we are dependent on both incomes to provide for our family in our current lifestyle. …

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Expanded Dimensions Give Resumes Power
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