OSHA Works 7 Years Drafting Chemical Plant Safety Rules

By Carollo, Russell | THE JOURNAL RECORD, June 7, 1991 | Go to article overview

OSHA Works 7 Years Drafting Chemical Plant Safety Rules


Carollo, Russell, THE JOURNAL RECORD


By Russell Carollo Cox News Service Karl Hurt's skin was melting as petroleum vapor exploded into a fireball around him. "All I could see was fire. I didn't know I was burned," said Hurt, still recovering from his injuries. "I stood there for a second, and then I ran. "I looked down and saw the meat on my arms was charred. The pain wasn't really bad until they started taking the bad part off." Hurt was burned in the August 1989 explosion at Phillips 66's Houston Chemical Complex in Pasadena, Texas. A co-worker, 24-year-old Darrell Quinn, was burned so badly that 45 hours of surgery couldn't save him. He died Christmas Day 1989. Phillips, a $12-billion-a-year company based in Bartlesville, was fined $720 by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Two months later, another explosion _ spewing debris for miles and registering on earthquake instruments at Rice University _ shook the same plant. This time, 23 people died and 314 were injured. It was the worst industrial accident in the history of OSHA, and the $5.7 million fine was the second largest ever proposed. Phillips is appealing. Union investigators blamed both explosions on poorly trained contract workers who opened valves by mistake. These explosions were among dozens of chemical accidents killing or injuring hundreds, displacing thousands and causing tens of millions of dollars in damages since 1984. Meanwhile, regulations addressing many of the apparent causes _ including better training for contract workers _ were tangled in a federal bureaucracy. OSHA proposed tougher chemical plant regulations after a chemical-plant disaster in Bhopal, India, killed more than 2,000 people in 1984. That was nearly seven years ago. "It's not an unusual time frame for a standard," said OSHA's Chappell Pierce, whose staff is writing the regulations. "We've had some that have taken 15 years." But Mike Wright of the United Steelworkers of America said, "It's obscene for an OSHA official to say six years is not a long time when it costs four dozen people's lives." OSHA's proposal addressed chemical plant maintenance, employee training, protective clothing and disaster plans. But work on the proposal stalled. Why it stalled is disputed. OSHA's Pierce said the agency decided to stop the work. But unions and an OSHA official said the federal Office of Management and Budget refused to let OSHA continue. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

OSHA Works 7 Years Drafting Chemical Plant Safety Rules
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.