Blue-Collar Workers Show Greater Job Stress Risks

By Moody, Lori | THE JOURNAL RECORD, July 3, 1991 | Go to article overview

Blue-Collar Workers Show Greater Job Stress Risks


Moody, Lori, THE JOURNAL RECORD


By Lori Moody Los Angeles Daily News LOS ANGELES _ They mix drinks and shoot the breeze with customers, but bartenders may not be the laid-back, take-it-all-in-stride people they appear to be.

A new study ranking occupations by blood pressures shows that bartenders have a higher risk of heart attack than 243 other occupations reviewed by J. Paul Leigh, a professor of economics at San Jose State University who has studied occupational safety and hazards for about nine years.

Ranked behind bartenders are laundry and dry-cleaning operators, public administrators, food-service workers, private child-care workers and bus drivers. Freight and material handlers, structural metal craftsmen and telephone operators also ranked among the top 10 occupations having the highest blood pressures.

"We have a misconception that white-collar professions _ bank executives, (oil company) executives. . .CEOs _ have the highest stress, therefore the highest blood pressure," Leigh said. "The opposite is true."

The study, which will appear in the August issue of the Journal of Occupational Medicine, uses data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years 1971 to 1975 and examines 20,729 people _ including teen- agers, retirees and homemakers _ in the United States.

Leigh restricted his study to 8,130 full-time workers 25 years and older.

The study ranks the occupations by diastolic and systolic blood pressures. Diastolic pressure is when the heart muscle is relaxed between beats. Systolic is the force exerted by the heart as it beats.

The study corroborates research from studies published in 1981 and 1988 in the American Journal of Public Health and in 1990 in the Journal of the American Medical Association that blue-collar workers may be at higher risk than executives for high blood pressure and heart attack because of job stress, Leigh said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Blue-Collar Workers Show Greater Job Stress Risks
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.