Ad Campaign Questions Global Warming Theory

By Wald, Matthew L. | THE JOURNAL RECORD, July 9, 1991 | Go to article overview

Ad Campaign Questions Global Warming Theory


Wald, Matthew L., THE JOURNAL RECORD


By Matthew L. Wald N.Y. Times News Service Coal-burning utility companies and coal producers, disturbed by public acceptance of the idea that burning fossil fuels will change the climate, are deciding whether to go national this fall with an ad campaign they tried in three markets earlier this year.

The advertising effort was tried out in Flagstaff, Ariz.; Fargo, N.D.; and Bowling Green, Ky.

The campaign produced nearly 2,000 requests to a toll-free telephone line for more information, said Gale Klappa, a vice president of Southern Co., a coal- using utility based in Atlanta.

The goal of the campaign, according to one planning document, is to "repos- ition global warming as theory (not fact)."

In Bowling Green, an ad showed a cartoon horse in earmuffs and scarf and said, "If the Earth is getting warmer, why is Kentucky getting colder?"

Another, with a cartoon man bundled up and holding a snow shovel, appeared in Minnesota and substituted "Minnea- polis" for "Kentucky."

"Those who are predicting catastro- phe have been very effective at getting their message across in national media, and in so-called `public service'& announcements," Klappa said in a telephone interview. "But there is another viewpoint, a substantial& viewpoint from a body of reputable scientists, and that viewpoint has really not been made available to a large majority."

The document was included in a packet of internal correspondence and other information relating to the cam- paign.

The packet was provided to The New York Times by the Sierra Club, the San Francisco-based environmental group that favors taking steps to reduce the risk of global warming. It had apparently been given the materials by someone who disagreed with the campaign's goals or approach.

Many climatologists are alarmed by the rising concentration in the Earth's atmosphere of carbon dioxide and other gases that they say will trap the sun's heat, raise temperatures and change rainfall patterns around the world. But scientists differ as to the extent of climate change or the speed with which it will occur.

The three scientists who form a "science advisory panel" for the cam- paign said in telephone interviews that the salient element in two of the ads, that some areas might be getting cooler, did not contradict the theory of global warming. But one of the three, Robert C. Balling Jr., director of the office of Climatology at Arizona State University, said in a telephone interview that the advertising campaign designers felt that an ad that simply discussed the contra- dictory state of evidence for global warming was "not punch enough."

Balling and another member of the panel, Dr. Patrick J. Michaels, Virgi- nia's climatologist and a professor of environmental sciences at the University of Virginia, have both asked to have their names removed from future mail- ings.

Balling, who taped radio ads used in Flagstaff, said some people who heard the ads "did not like the idea that I was coming on the radio" and acting as "a mouthpiece" for a private group.

Michaels said that with only three names on the mailing, people would identify him as the source of the information, while he was not, in fact, the author, and that the size of the panel was so small that it made the position appear scientifically unpopular.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ad Campaign Questions Global Warming Theory
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.