Rising Health-Care Costs Hit State HMOs, Hospitals

By Wolfe, Lou Anne | THE JOURNAL RECORD, July 31, 1991 | Go to article overview

Rising Health-Care Costs Hit State HMOs, Hospitals


Wolfe, Lou Anne, THE JOURNAL RECORD


By Lou Anne Wolfe Journal Record Staff Reporter Rising health-care costs may have helped push the number of Oklahomans enrolled in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) to 188,241 people last year _ a 91.7 percent increase from 98,180 in 1985.

A 1991 study by Arthur Andersen & Co. and the American College of Healthcare Executives also showed that 17 Oklahoma hospitals were closed during that five-year period. In January, HealthCare Investment Analysts reported the number of distressed Oklahoma hospitals at 42.

Oklahoma's health-care workforce of 116,700 people in June 1990 was 9.77 percent of the state's total non-agricultural workforce of 1.19 million people, the report said.

The report, titled "The Future of Healthcare: Physician and Hospital Relations," is a "Delphi" study, whose objective is to obtain a consensus of opinion on trends. The Delphi forecasting method is to question professionals who independently consider the issues and predict future developments.

Thirteen Oklahoma health care providers and payors were among 2,600 who participated in the study, Arthur Andersen said. Forecasts in the previous studies have proven valid.

The study predicted that health-care's share of the nation's Gross National Product will rise to at least 13 percent by 1996, and the nation will spend more than $1 trillion, or $3,900 a person, on health care that year.

As federal funding for health care continues to be curbed, more people will enroll in managed health-care plans that put tighter controls on costs and utilization, the study said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rising Health-Care Costs Hit State HMOs, Hospitals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.