Failure on Highway Bill Could Benefit State

By May, Bill | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 4, 1991 | Go to article overview

Failure on Highway Bill Could Benefit State


May, Bill, THE JOURNAL RECORD


By Bill May Journal Record Staff Reporter If the United States Congress fails to act on pending highway funding legislation, Oklahoma will end up with more money, Oklahoma's transportation director said Tuesday.

While the state would lose federal money if there is no new highway funding bill, Oklahoma would gain in that federal gasoline taxes would no longer be sent to Washington, but would remain in the state, Bobby G. Green said.

"I don't really expect that to happen," he said during a meeting of the Oklahoma Transportation Commission in Oklahoma City. "It would be great if they allowed that money to stay here, but I'm a realist and can't believe that Congress would give up that money.

"I believe there will be an extension (to the current highway funding law), a new bill or at the least a continuing resolution to allow the budget to remain." Motorists now pay 14 cents per gallon federal tax, nine cents of which goes to the federal highway trust fund which provides about 80 percent of the cost of building and maintaining federal and state highways. The other five cents was added in December to help reduce the federal deficit.

Green made his comments during commission discussions about the department's planned $506.38 million budget for fiscal year 1992 which began July 1. The budget, down 2.6 percent from $520.1 million in actual expenditures in the previous fiscal year, passed without dissent.

Although the budget is down, operating expenditures are expected to reach $167.6 million, up 6.1 percent from $157.87 million. The budget also calls for capital, or highway improvement, expenditures to fall to $338.7 million, a 6.4 percent drop from $362.2 million.

These figures could change if Congress changes the formula by which states receive money from the federal highway trust fund. Oklahoma has about $123 million in unobligated federal funds which can be used, Green said. This is about half of the expected $250 million to be received during federal fiscal year 1992 which begins Oct. 1. The state's fiscal year runs from July 1 to June 30 while the federal fiscal year is from Oct. 1 through Sept. 30.

"The current (highway funding bill) expires Sept. 30, and there seems to be some question as to whether there is enough support to pass an additional 5-cent per gallon tax (to further help reduce the federal deficit)," Green said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Failure on Highway Bill Could Benefit State
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.