Critical Art of Selfrketing Key to Career Advancement

By Belt, Joy Reed | THE JOURNAL RECORD, October 22, 1992 | Go to article overview

Critical Art of Selfrketing Key to Career Advancement


Belt, Joy Reed, THE JOURNAL RECORD


When the fifty most successful corporate women in America listed in a recent issue of Business Week Magazine were asked what career path they chose to reach the top, the largest percentage (24 percent) said they had fastacked to the board room from marketing and sales. An observation could be made that these business leaders excelled both in marketing their products and in selling themselves.

The person who gets a job in the present competitive market will be the one who masters the critical art of selfrketing. When the requisite skills and experience are equal, the job seeker who most effectively communicates the reasons why he should be hired above all others, will get the job. In other words, marketing today has become a professional and personal tool and not just a department.

A strategic step in selfrketing is to be aware of how employers view the ideal employee. In a recessionary economy, they look beyond basic skills to how quickly and innovatively a person can adapt to constant changes in the global marketplace. Flexibility, the ability to adjust easily and willingly to different conditions, is also an important asset for success on the job. And even though corporate loyalty has diminished in recent years, employers still expect workers to be committed to give their best effort to the job.

In her book "Marketing Yourself," Dorothy Leeds tells readers how they can become career entrepreneurs in the business of selling the ultimate products _ themselves. She writes that attitude is more important than aptitude in sales and marketing success, and that if you don't believe in your product, no one else will. Leeds tells readers: "You are the most important resource a company can have, the most important investment it will make. Each hiring decision costs a company time and money _ and a wrong decision can lose clients, hurt morale and damage public image. You will have to prove to the company it is making the right decision by hiring you."

QUESTION: I am a young female executive who still believes in "having it all" and am considering joining the mommy trackers in a few years. …

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