High-Tech Firms' Work Shows Support for Trade Agreement

By Enders, John | THE JOURNAL RECORD, May 6, 1993 | Go to article overview

High-Tech Firms' Work Shows Support for Trade Agreement


Enders, John, THE JOURNAL RECORD


By John Enders

Associated Press

SAN JOSE, Calif. _ The North American Free Trade Agreement may be having a rough time in Congress but U.S. high-tech companies already are voting with their pocketbooks, opening new operations or expanding existing ones in Mexico.

High-technology companies broadly support the treaty's goals of lowering trade barriers, but industry executives say their interest in doing business inside Mexico preceded it.

"We are a global industry in a borderless world," said Dave Barram of Apple Computer Inc., which last month announced it was opening a sales operation in Mexico to capitalize on its fast-growing Pacific market.

NAFTA _ a pact to phase out tariffs on trade between the United States, Canada and Mexico _ was signed by President Bush before he left office.

It requires approval in Congress, where it has been criticized by environmental and labor groups. Mexican and U.S. officials are negotiating add-on agreements urged by President Clinton to address environmental and labor concerns.

But high-tech companies already have benefited from stiffer competition among Mexican businesses and an increasingly open market.

Personal computer sales in Mexico are projected to reach nearly $1 billion in 1993, a 29 percent jump from last year, according to International Data Corp., a market research firm.

"They want the technology. They want the equipment," said Rachel Mullins, executive director of the Los Angeles-based Pacific chapter of the United States-Mexico Chamber of Commerce.

Allen White, director of Apple Latin America, said the free trade treaty would boost investment in Mexico, especially in the first few years. But he said expansion south of the border would continue with or without it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

High-Tech Firms' Work Shows Support for Trade Agreement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.