Book Finds Gender Gap in Costs at Marketplace

By Duston, Diane | THE JOURNAL RECORD, May 18, 1993 | Go to article overview

Book Finds Gender Gap in Costs at Marketplace


Duston, Diane, THE JOURNAL RECORD


By Diane Duston

Associated Press

WASHINGTON _ Women in America pay more than men for the same goods and services, from cars to health care to dry cleaning, according to a new book aimed at helping women get more for their money.

For example, women buy about half the new cars sold each year, but a white woman would pay about $150 more for the same car as a white man and an African-American woman would pay about $800 more, according to "Why Women Pay More," published by consumer advocate Ralph Nader's Center for Responsive Law.

"There is an element of suckerism," said book's author Frances Cerra Whittelsey, a former reporter for Newsday and The New York Times. She said culturally women have not educated themselves to money matters so well as they should.

When women visit doctors with the same illness as a man, they're prescribed more tests and drugs and told to come back more times than men, her book says.

And at dry cleaning establishments, a woman's white cotton shirt traditionally costs about 27 percent more to launder than the same style man's shirt, the book reports.

Whittelsey found similar inconsistencies in other areas.

In auto insurance, women over age 25 pay the same as men although women have fewer accidents.

In clothing, a man's knit shirt is almost always less expensive than the same style in the women's department.

For haircuts, two out of three shops in New York charged women $20 for basic shampoo, cut and blow dry, while charging men $16.

To make matters worse, women still are earning an average of 74 cents for every $1 earned by a man, according to the book.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Book Finds Gender Gap in Costs at Marketplace
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.