Area Doctors Aim Medical Students to Primary Care

By May, Bill | THE JOURNAL RECORD, May 29, 1993 | Go to article overview

Area Doctors Aim Medical Students to Primary Care


May, Bill, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Journal Record Staff Reporter

Many groups throughout the state periodically call for help for specific industries, even asking the government and the public to foot the bill.

But a group of Oklahoma doctors is tackling redistribution of the medical delivery system in the state on a voluntary basis and is even putting up the money.

Well, most of the money. Corporate sponsorship and contributions will not be turned down, according to Dr. William Bernhardt of Midwest City and Dr. Mike Winzenread of Oklahoma City.

They are members of a committee of the Oklahoma Academy of Family Physicians, which is trying to convince first-year medical students that there's more to life than huge fees and glamour of certain medical subspecialities. They, in fact, are trying to encourage students to select one of the primary care specialities for their careers.

"There are specialities and sub-specialities which pay more than primary care in monetary terms, but I feel we have more pay in terms of job satisfaction and feeling of accomplishment," said Winzenread, whose practice is at 4200 W. Memorial Rd.

It's this satisfaction and the interaction with patients which is causing more medical students to select one of the primary care or family physician specialities, he said.

"I feel that medical students today have more of a social conscience; they want to do the right thing and move into rural areas in which there is a maladjustment of health care delivery," he said. "There are a lot of students who are interested in our program, but they need help."

The program to which Winzenread referred is the Future Physicians for Oklahoma, sponsored by the Family Health Foundation of Oklahoma, the academy's philanthropic arm.

Under this program, members of the academy promote primary care, especially in the first year when students are considering a specialty to study.

Medical students are exposed to preceptors specializing in primary or family care between their first and second years of study and work with these preceptors, primarily in rural areas for the remainder of their medical education.

Highlight of the program is a special internship between the third and fourth years when students spend two months in a clinic specializing in primary care. During this period, the students receive a $250 per week stipend plus room and board.

Most of the funding for these stipends comes from the foundation, said Bernhardt, whose practice is at 2801 Parklawn Dr. in Midwest City.

Limits of the coverage are based upon the number of preceptors who volunteer and where they are located.

But the program is more than just the physicians involved in primary care and family practice, Bernhardt said. The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine is beefing up its family physician program and providing more information about the specialities to students.

"There are six divisions working to get contributions to help provide the scholarships for the students," said Bernhardt, chief fund raiser for the program. "We have (divisions for) large clinics, hospitals, physicians, pharmaceutical companies, foundations and corporations.

"We'd like to get more businesses and corporations involved, because one of the most important aspects of bringing new business to a community and to Oklahoma is the accessibility and quality of the medical care delivery system," he said. "That's probably the second or third thing that a company looks at when it starts looking for a place to do business. Most companies want to provide a quality medical service for their employees, and they want to be in a community where this is available.

"But in most small communities, physicians and the health care industry are looked at more as business operations than they are in Oklahoma City or Tulsa.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Area Doctors Aim Medical Students to Primary Care
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.