Data Bases Help Companies Find Properties

By Harvey, Betty Jane | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 29, 1993 | Go to article overview

Data Bases Help Companies Find Properties


Harvey, Betty Jane, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Soliciting business for Oklahoma by providing information about available industrial and warehouse properties in the state is the goal of two organizations supplying the data base.

Both the Oklahoma Department of Commerce and Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. have business data bases that have information on buildings that are for sale in the state. They obtain their information from area chambers of commerce, real estate agents, brokers and anyone else who might inform them that a site is for sale.

"Basically, what we at the business resource center do is we keep an inventory of listings of different industrial buildings throughout the state of Oklahoma," said Gary Marks, manager of the economic development department for OG E.

"We get that information from the chambers of commerce, Realtors, our commercial and industrial brokers in Oklahoma City and other parts of the state and Tulsa. We've got available in our data base buildings from all over the state," he said.

Most of the buildings listed in the data base are between 5,000 square feet and 500,000 square feet. OG E keeps its system current with properties that are for sale, where the department of commerce lists buildings that are "available and unavailable."

Data bases for both OG E and the commerce department mainly list manufacturing, production, warehousing and distribution type properties.

"We have a real estate information system, and primarily what we work with is manufacturing-type real estate for industrial prospects, and we even get into warehousing and distribution buildings that are presently existing. It's for recruiting business and industry to those locations," said Michael Townsend, industrial research assistant at the commerce department.

"Sometimes a prospect is interested in moving, so we primarily track those kinds of buildings. We are really aggressive in searching for those buildings. We rely on local communities, local owners and brokers and input them (available properties) into a date base called the Real Estate Information System," Townsend said.

OG E does have some office buildings on its list, but retail and other properties are avoided for both data bases because they are too hard to track.

"We're primarily interested in attracting primary-type jobs as opposed to secondary, where they don't export anything to another part of the country. Restaurants would take away from another restaurant across the road, as opposed to bringing new jobs to Oklahoma," Townsend said.

Prospects can contact the commerce department whose staff can reference buildings in Oklahoma by region, county, size or any other information that is available in the data base.

Sometimes a building will be available and then become unavailable because it has been sold or leased, Townsend said. Those unavailable buildings are kept in the commerce department's computer because they may become available again, he said.

In the commerce department's Real Estate Information System, about 1,600 buildings are listed. About 500 buildings are available, Townsend said. Buildings are listed by number.

He can run a one-page report of a building that lists the location, size, amenities, real estate agent involved and his or her name and address, history and other information. It might not list the sale price but could say negotiable, or list the lease price, he said.

OG E has the same service.

With about 650 buildings in its system, OG E exchanges information with the commerce department and chambers of commerce, Marks said. …

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