Boom Times under Way for Advocacy Advertising

By Dart, Bob | THE JOURNAL RECORD, November 11, 1993 | Go to article overview

Boom Times under Way for Advocacy Advertising


Dart, Bob, THE JOURNAL RECORD


WASHINGTON _ Turn on Your TV: Harry and Louise, the insurance industry's favorite couple, are fretting over "spending caps" in President Clinton's health care plan.

Open your newspapers and magazines: A Wall Street firm has bought a full page to declare "NAFTA means more jobs, more exports and higher living standards." On another page, an environmental group counters: "If Flipper could vote, NAFTA wouldn't stand a chance."

These are boom times for advocacy advertising.

"This year, to date, has been the greatest for advocacy and issue oriented advertising in CNN's history," said Joe Uva, advertising manager for the Cable News Network.

"The use of media in general has increased" as assorted interest groups seek to influence Congress, said Steve Colford of Advertising Age, an ad industry newspaper.

By the time the House votes next week on the North American Free Trade Agreement, Colford said, pro- and anti-NAFTA groups will have spent more than $10 million to get out their messages.

Meanwhile, the health insurance industry is spending $4 million this year on its ad campaign that includes the "Harry and Louise" 30-second spots that have so upset first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. And the issue is just beginning to heat up.

"We haven't seen the heavy advertising on health care yet," said Marc Rosenberg, The Washington Post's manager of public policy advertising.

A lot of organizations are watching to see how health reform legislation shapes up before buying space and time, agreed Linda Cheesman, advertising manager of The National Journal. "I had one client who said their organization is `keeping its powder dry.' Quite a few advertisers are in a position of `wait and see'," she said.

Advocacy advertising is clearly coming of age. Groups on all sides of complex public policy issues are increasingly selling their causes in the same kind of media campaigns that advertisers have long used to sell soap powder.

Indeed, The Washington Post has reorganized its advertising department to capitalize on the trend. Rosenberg, a veteran of Capitol Hill and trade associations, was hired to head a newly separate office for public policy advertising.

Although advocacy advertising is certainly not new to the pages of the Post, Rosenberg said, "a lot of new groups are coming in now for NAFTA and health care. Two years ago, some of these groups didn't have the slightest thought that they'd be advertising with us."

Most national advocacy advertising is aimed either "inside the Beltway" at Congress and the White House or at a much broader audience outside of Washington. Those ads also seek to influence the nation's policy makers, but indirectly, by generating "grassroots" concern that prompts folks in the heartland to phone or fax their opinions to Washington.

Increasingly, advocacy ads are being run in local newspapers and TV and radio stations in states or districts of key lawmakers whose vote are needed on a particular issue.

More advocacy groups may be advertising because traditional political selling methods have fallen into disfavor. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Boom Times under Way for Advocacy Advertising
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.