Administration Offers Plan for Air Control Corporation

By Schmid, Randolf E. | THE JOURNAL RECORD, May 4, 1994 | Go to article overview

Administration Offers Plan for Air Control Corporation


Schmid, Randolf E., THE JOURNAL RECORD


WASHINGTON _ The Clinton administration, hoping to strip away the tangle of federal rules that critics say have stifled modernization, launched an effort Tuesday to switch the nation's air traffic control system to a corporation.

"Today's announcement is good news for the traveling public, for the airlines, and for the controllers and technicians who keep the air traffic control system running," said Transportation Secretary Federico Pena.

He said a federal corporation would be able to purchase technology more flexibly, borrow for long-term capital investments, "and deploy and reward its workers more effectively."

He said the current system, operated by the Federal Aviation Administration, is hampered by an out-of-date personnel system, antiquated equipment and a complex process for replacing it, and the need for long-term funding.

Vice President Al Gore joined Pena for a news conference at National Airport and said, "I want to serve notice that we mean business about this."

Gore held up a vacuum tube representing the older technology now used in the air traffic control system. In his other hand, he held a computer chip that he said can do more work than 3.5 million of the vacuum tubes.

The American air traffic control system is the safest in the world "thanks to the Herculean efforts of the people in the control towers," Gore said. "We need to move forward with change before catastrophe strikes."

The plan announced Tuesday calls for establishing a government-run corporation, funded by fees paid by airlines, to manage the system that controls movement of an estimated 22,000 commercial airline flights daily.

Currently, government corporations run the Postal Service, Tennessee Valley Authority, Amtrak and some other activities. The idea of adding air traffic control has been kicking around industry and government for years, and was revived in Gore's proposals to "reinvent government."

Separating air traffic control from the FAA could permit faster installation of new technology, save money and improve service while still protecting safety, said Frank Kruesi, who heads the Transportation Department committee that worked up the plan.

But the idea faces a mixed reception in Congress, where opposition has already been expressed by Rep. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Administration Offers Plan for Air Control Corporation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.