Quayle Offers Economic Policy, Holds Views on Candidacy

By Rodgers, Kim | THE JOURNAL RECORD, October 12, 1994 | Go to article overview

Quayle Offers Economic Policy, Holds Views on Candidacy


Rodgers, Kim, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Former Vice President Dan Quayle declined to say whether he will run for president in 1996, but he did present some of his ideas on economic policy Tuesday during a visit to Oklahoma City.

"Right now I'm just traveling and getting feedback to find out if my message is the right one for America now," Quayle told a gathering Tuesday afternoon at the Myriad Convention Center. He said he will decide after the November elections whether to run for president.

The United States needs to lower its budget deficit, pursue international markets, decrease the capital-gains tax, let the private sector into public education and make laws to cut the number of nuisance lawsuits, Quayle told participants of the Oklahoma Business Conference.

And the Democrats who said, "It's the economy, stupid," during the 1992 presidential campaign had a point, Quayle said.

"The economy is always the priority, but there's another component _ foreign policy. Foreign policy is the essence of being president."

The North American Free Trade Agreement has created jobs in the United States, rather than take them away as opponents had warned, Quayle said. The United States should now pursue markets overseas, including China.

"The Clinton administration is correct in trying to delink the human rights and trade issues in China," Quayle said. A greater concern for U.S. policy makers should be the prospect of China sending nuclear weapons to countries unfriendly to the United States, he said.

Quayle emphasized four issues: a prudent tax policy, education, legal system reform and values. …

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