OSU-OKC Hosts Conflict Resolution Workshop

THE JOURNAL RECORD, October 29, 1994 | Go to article overview

OSU-OKC Hosts Conflict Resolution Workshop


A conflict resolution workshop, "Breaking the Cycle of Violence," is scheduled Tuesday by the Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Center for Organizational Improvement, 900 N. Portland Ave.

Annita Bridges, an attorney and mediator, will lead the workshop on how conflict can lead to violence, non-destructive methods for resolving conflict, and ways that community members can work together to combat violence.

"Tragically, violence has become pervasive in our society," Bridges said. "In the classroom, the workplace, the street, and the home _ none of us can escape the realization that we each stand a good chance of being touched by violence in some way.

"This realization has increased the attention of being placed on violence and violence prevention by school officials, employers, community members, and public officials."

The workshop, scheduled from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tuesday, is designed to bring people together who are interested in determining the causes of violence and finding solutions.

The workshop will include a three-hour interactive satellite video conference featuring Jesse Jackson, president of the Rainbow Coalition; Sarah and James Brady, Center to Prevent Handgun Violence; Jocelyn Elders, U.S. surgeon general; Al Shanker, president of the American Federation of Teachers; and Ed Zigler, founder of Head Start.

"This workshop offers participants access to top experts and interaction with others with the same concerns, whether they are across town or around the world," said Bill Nelson, director of OSU-OKC's Center for Organizational Improvement.

Bridges is president of Litigation Alternatives Inc., an Oklahoma City company specializing in conflict resolution training, systems design and mediation services.

She works with businesses, organizations, school districts and government agencies. Formerly an attorney with Kerr-McGee Corp., she is currently working with the Oklahoma City Public School's peer mediation program for middle school students.

Cost of "Breaking the Cycle of Violence" workshop is $75, which includes printed materials and refreshments. To register, or for more information, call the OSU-OKC Center for Organizational Improvement at 945-3278. . . James D. Fellers, an Oklahoma City attorney, was among the speakers at the 1994 Symposium on Cryptologic History at Ft. George G. Meade, Md. The symposium considered the offensive against the Axis Powers with specific emphasis on the ground war in Europe and the emergence of air war cryptology.

During World War II, Fellers served in the select Special Branch of War Department General Staff as the designated special intelligence officer to Major Gen. Elwood R. "Pete" Quesada, commander of all fighter bombers on the invasion of June 6, 1944, and commanding general of IX Tactical Air Command in support of the First Army throughout the campaigns of 1944-45 from Omaha Beach to the conclusion at Weimar, Germany.

Fellers discussed the tactical employment in the field of top secret intelligence as fused with other obtainable lower level intelligence.

He is of counsel to the law firm of Fellers, Snider, Blankenship, Bailey Tippens. . . Six new associates have joined Crowe Dunlevy.

Joining the Oklahoma City office were Cynthia L. Andrews, Edward E. Lane III, C. Robert Stell and Cori H. Loomis. Joining the firm's Tulsa office were Jon Ed Brown and Brad R. Carson.

Andrews is a certified public accountant and focuses her law practice in tax and estates and trusts.

Lane concentrates his practice in corporate securities and taxation of businesses. …

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OSU-OKC Hosts Conflict Resolution Workshop
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