Hampton Named to Committee of National Institutes of Health

THE JOURNAL RECORD, June 26, 1996 | Go to article overview

Hampton Named to Committee of National Institutes of Health


Dr. James W. Hampton, F.A.C.P., an Oklahoma City hematologist/medical oncologist, has been named to the Ad Hoc Advisory Committee for the Office of Research on Minority Health at the National Institutes of Health.

Hampton is with the Oklahoma City office of Cancer Care Associates, a private practice formed in 1972. He is medical director of Integris Baptist Medical Center's Troy and Dollie Smith Cancer Center and a clinical professor at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.

He is one of only eight Native American cancer specialists in the United States, said Dr. John Ruffin, associate director for minority health research at NIH.

There is only one Native American medical oncologist per 300,000 Native American population, compared with more than three per 100,000 of the general population, according to The American Society of Clinical Oncology.

The advisory committee for NIH's Office of Research on Minority Health reviews projects and initiatives to improve minority Americans' health and participation in biomedical and behavioral research.

NIH's minority health research office was established in 1990. In 1993 Congress authorized it to help reduce a disproportionate occurrence of illnesses among minorities and to encourage minorities to enter the medical field.

Hampton is a Chickasaw from Durant. He serves on the national board of the American Cancer Society and as chairman of a Cancer Control Network for the National Cancer Institute.

Heart procedure performed

Dr. Scott K. Lucas performed the first minimally invasive coronary artery bypass graft in the state earlier this month.

He performed the procedure June 1 at Deaconess Hospital.

The new procedure is considered minimally invasive for two reasons: it involves a smaller incision than standard coronary artery bypass graft and the patient's heart is not stopped.

In a standard procedure, the surgeon makes a large incision down the middle of the patient's chest through the breast bone. The patient's heart is stopped, and a heart-lung machine continues to circulate blood.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hampton Named to Committee of National Institutes of Health
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.