Redoing Software May Ease Traffic on World Wide Web

By John Markoff N. Y. Times News Service | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 19, 1997 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Redoing Software May Ease Traffic on World Wide Web


John Markoff N. Y. Times News Service, THE JOURNAL RECORD


SAN FRANCISCO -- The World Wide Wait may be coming to an end.

The explosive growth of the World Wide Web in the last five years has created increasing computer traffic jams as the number of users has continued to outstrip the hardware and data-network resources on which the Internet is based.

But now a group of researchers has demonstrated that not all of the congestion results from the sheer weight of the millions of new users trying to squeeze onto the Internet. They suggest that a significant part of the delay has been created by the design of the software underlying the Web. A study published by the group, based at the World Wide Web Consortium in Cambridge, Mass., an industry- sponsored group that sets standards, also shows that a redesign of that software would improve basic performance on the Web. The authors of the report were able to demonstrate data retrieval speeds twice to eight times as fast as the speed using current World Wide Web software. Individual users are expected to see improvements like faster times to download information, and the collective benefit could be still greater because the basic set of conventions, or protocol, for Internet operation would be used more efficiently. Later this year, browsers that support the new protocol are to be available, though current browsers will continue to work with the new software. "This will be good for the whole Internet," John Klensin, a network designer at MCI Communications, said. The World Wide Web software works in conjunction with the basic software of the Internet, known as TCP/IP, to permit users to retrieve data without worrying about where it is on the global Internet. The Internet consists of a growing collection of software protocols, and the Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- the "http" at the beginning of many electronic addresses -- has been the basis of the World Wide Web since 1990. "Everyone has known about the problems involving congestion on the Internet," said Jim Gettys, a Digital Equipment Corporation software designer who is a visiting scientist at the consortium and is one of the authors of the study. "What is less well known is that the World Wide Web protocol has been defeating the congestion control mechanisms in the Internet's underlying protocols." Gettys said that the interaction between Web software and the basic Internet routing software became an issue as Web use proliferated in recent times.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Redoing Software May Ease Traffic on World Wide Web
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?