Unions Fear That Welfare-to-Work Programs Will Take Jobs, Lower Wages

By Galvin, Kevin | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 26, 1997 | Go to article overview

Unions Fear That Welfare-to-Work Programs Will Take Jobs, Lower Wages


Galvin, Kevin, THE JOURNAL RECORD


WASHINGTON -- A woman laid off from her county government job returns to the same security guard duties under New York's Work Experience Program at lower pay, with no benefits, no vacation.

After a hard-fought campaign to unionize janitors in Baltimore schools, organizers are dismayed to see the janitors replaced with people working off their public assistance checks.

With welfare reform set to push public aid recipients into the work force nationwide, union chiefs say there is evidence that workers in well-paying jobs could be displaced by subsidized employees, depressing wages. They also worry that people working off public assistance may not be protected from unfair labor practices, and that public sector jobs covered by union contracts may vanish as the administration of welfare is turned over to private entities. "The impact of welfare reform potentially extends to every workplace in America," said AFL-CIO President John Sweeney. At its winter meeting in Los Angeles, the AFL-CIO executive council announced the intention of its affiliates to organize "workfare workers" into unions and ensure they are covered by existing labor law. The welfare bill President Clinton signed into law last year ended the federal government's 61-year guarantee of assistance to needy families, imposed new work rules and time limits and gave states free rein to develop programs. Clinton wants $3.6 billion for state and local job-training grants and tax breaks to employers who hire long-term recipients. Employers would get a 50 percent credit for the first $10,000 a year in wages. The AFL-CIO leaders said the new welfare law is silent on whether those working under it would be entitled to the same protections guaranteed to other workers regarding safety, overtime and the right to organize. "Federal laws regulating employer behavior around wages, hours and conditions have not gone away just because we have a new welfare law," they said in a statement. "The AFL-CIO will fight against any erosion of employee protections for former welfare recipients placed in public or private workplaces." While there is broad labor support for the notion that everyone who can work should work, union chiefs were angered by the law's impact on children and immigrants. Now the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the Service Employees International Union say that organizing welfare recipients as they are moved into jobs will be a priority.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Unions Fear That Welfare-to-Work Programs Will Take Jobs, Lower Wages
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.