Intel Forms Wireless Net Access Coalition

By Jonathan Marshall San Francisco Chronicle | THE JOURNAL RECORD, August 11, 1997 | Go to article overview

Intel Forms Wireless Net Access Coalition


Jonathan Marshall San Francisco Chronicle, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Intel Corp. last week announced a broad coalition of hardware, software and wireless service vendors to bring wireless Internet access to the masses.

The Mobile Data Initiative aims to create simple technology to let people check their e-mail or browse the Web on the road, without having to plug into a telephone line.

Using wireless communications as the link, "the initiative seeks to provide business users with access to data anywhere, anytime, without compromising notebook PC performance and capability," said Stephen Nachtsheim, general manager of Intel's mobile and hand-held products group. Besides Intel, the coalition includes major notebook computer manufacturers such as Toshiba and IBM, software giant Microsoft, and a group of wireless service providers known as the North America GSM Alliance. The latter alliance includes Pacific Bell Mobile Services and other personal communications services providers using a digital standard known as Global System for Mobile Communications. GSM is used throughout Europe, as well as many countries in Asia, Latin America and North America. Intel helped forge a similar initiative with GSM-based wireless companies in Europe about 18 months ago, Nachtsheim said. The success in developing wireless data standards and technology there encouraged Intel to mount a similar effort in the United States. Although Intel isn't a force in the wireless market, it stands to gain from growing sales of portable PCs, nearly all of which use its microprocessors. Portable PCs would become more attractive if they could connect more easily to data networks. In the United States, the wireless data market has been nearly moribund, however. The Strategis Group in Washington, D.C., estimated that out of 40 million cellular phone owners, only half a million used wireless e-mail last year. Yet as Dataquest noted in a recent analysis, "the opportunity for wireless data communications in the U.S. is huge." It estimated that 10.6 million mobile professionals use computers in their work. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Intel Forms Wireless Net Access Coalition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.