Donald Trump on Donald Trump: He Loves It!

By McShane, Larry | THE JOURNAL RECORD, November 19, 1997 | Go to article overview

Donald Trump on Donald Trump: He Loves It!


McShane, Larry, THE JOURNAL RECORD


NEW YORK -- Donald J. Trump is promoting his book, which in turn promotes Donald J. Trump and his recovery from a $975 million hole that nearly sent The Donald to The Dumps. In his new effort, Trump makes a rare admission: His financial woes were his own fault.

The Donald has learned his lesson. Book promotion now takes a backseat to business.

And so a noon interview is slowly pushed back ... 12:10 ...12:20 ... 12:30. Trump is on an important conference call; the question and answer session must wait. And so it does, until Trump can finally hang up the phone in his Trump Tower office, high above Manhattan. "How did you like the book?" he inquires, and one thing quickly becomes clear: Not as much as Trump does. He absolutely loves Trump: The Art of the Comeback, the tale of his return from near-bankruptcy to a personal net worth estimated at $1.4 billion by Forbes magazine. (Trump, by the way, says it's more like $3.7 billion.) In his book, the developer offers Trump's Top 10 Comeback Tips for folks intent on duplicating his success -- an eclectic list that starts with No. 1, "Play golf," and ends with No. 10, "Always have a prenuptial agreement." At times it seems Trump must have written his book with one hand - - much of its 244 pages features The Donald patting himself on The Back over his business and personal dealings. "I believe this book is the best of my three," allows Trump. Trump, whose previous books Art of the Deal and Surviving At Top were best-sellers, doesn't shy from his personal life this time out. He discusses his two failed marriages, to Ivana and then to Marla. His conclusion: It was their fault. Ivana wanted to talk too much about work. Marla Maples went the other way, demanding he come home each day by 5 p.m. Neither woman agreed with Trump's versions. Trump, unfazed, stands by his comments. There is a happy medium between the attitudes of his two wives, he said, "but I haven't been able to find it. …

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