Moore's Strategic Growth Plan

By Currin, Darren | THE JOURNAL RECORD, October 9, 1998 | Go to article overview

Moore's Strategic Growth Plan


Currin, Darren, THE JOURNAL RECORD


When the City of Moore received its charter in the early 1960s, its original concept was to function strictly as a bedroom community. But now, Mayor Glenn Lewis believes such an existence is impossible.

To better participate in the economic growth enjoyed by other areas of Oklahoma City, the Moore City Council has adopted a comprehensive plan to meet projected needs and goals to the year 2020.

The Moore Plan 21 outlines the specific areas of the city which are prime for new construction as well as the necessary infrastructure to support new development. "We needed a plan that looks at our future on where we want to grow and how we want to grow," says Steve Eddy, assistant city manager. According to Lewis, the plan is the brainchild of Eddy, who adopted the idea back in 1989. But work never began on the plan until February 1997, when funding finally became available to undertake the project. "This is not an inexpensive plan," notes Eddy. "The city has not been able to afford to do something like this until the last couple of years." In order for Moore to take a giant leap from its current position over the next 20 years, the plan shows the city must prepare and encourage new commercial real estate development. One particular need is for industrial space, Eddy says, which the community lacks. Having good, quality industrial space would hopefully attract new industries to the city. Lewis notes Moore has set aside three areas for industrial parks: on Tower Drive, at Broadway and S. 19th, and Pole Road and 27th. With Interstate 35 traveling alongside these areas as it runs through the city, the plan suggests the potential parks are prime for development. "The NAFTA highway is mentioned in the plans and we can take advantage of that by offering service facilities along the interstate," explains Eddy. In addition to industrial development, the Moore Plan 21 targets much of the I-35 frontage for extensive retail use. "There are several types of retailers that we would like to see come into the city, like CompUSA, Best Buy, Target Corp. and K- Mart," he says. "We have a city of 47,000 people and we don't even a have a bookstore, so we have a real need for a Waldenbooks or a Barnes and Noble." Even with the plan just a few weeks old, new retail development activity is rapidly picking up pace. Under way is Moore's first major new retail development since the construction of the Wal-Mart Supercenter almost two years ago. Located at S. …

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