Women Business Owners Will Pay for Convenience

By Neese, Terry | THE JOURNAL RECORD, April 1, 2000 | Go to article overview

Women Business Owners Will Pay for Convenience


Neese, Terry, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Business women are the primary decision-makers in their households fully two-thirds or more of the time when purchasing a variety of goods and services for their homes -- such as telephone services, television/cable services, and insurance policies, as well as clothing. In addition, they take the lead in selecting Internet service providers more than half of the time.

These findings, from a new report by the National Foundation for Women Business Owners (NFWBO), demonstrate the economic impact of working women. The report is based on a nationally representative survey of women entrepreneurs and women employees that was sponsored by AT&T and the Principal Financial Group.

"The study also identified significant differences between the consumer practices of women business owners and women employees," explained Lois E. Haber, NFWBO immediate past chair and president and chief executive of Delaware Valley Financial Services of Berwyn, Pa. "Women business owners are more likely than women employees to purchase online, invest in stocks and bonds, and pay for services that make their lives easier."

Women business owners and women employees are both active Internet users. "Six in 10 women business owners and women employees say they use the Internet with some frequency," explained Esther Silver-Parker, president of the AT&T Foundation. "Three-fourths of business women who use the Internet are going online to gather information prior to making purchases."

The most frequent online buys for business women are leisure items, computer equipment and travel reservations. One-third of women business owners and women employees who make acquisitions online also conduct banking transactions and paying bills online.

"However, women business owners are more likely than women employees to make purchases online," added Silver-Parker. "A 57 percent majority of women business owners who use the Internet have purchased products or services online, compared to only 40 percent of women employees."

Andi Donaghy, assistant director for individual marketing for the Principal Financial Group, noted "business women are also active in the investment arena. The NFWBO survey shows that women business owners are significantly more likely than women employees to invest in stocks and bonds; nearly three-quarters (72 percent) of women business owners have investments in stock, bonds or mutual funds, compared to 58 percent of women employees.

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