Proposed New Center Would Help Developmentally Handicapped Kids

By Talley, Tim | THE JOURNAL RECORD, May 31, 2000 | Go to article overview

Proposed New Center Would Help Developmentally Handicapped Kids


Talley, Tim, THE JOURNAL RECORD


OKLAHOMA CITY -- Helping developmentally handicapped children is the goal of a fund-raising drive for a proposed $6 million center to diagnose and treat developmental problems, the founder of the National Institute on Developmental Delays said Tuesday.

"We can train pediatricians. We can train therapists," the Rev. Paul Zahler said as he announced plans for the new facility on the grounds of St. Gregory's College in Shawnee.

"We're offering now a new perspective with people with developmental delays," the Roman Catholic priest said.

The proposed center will provide overnight and extended housing for children and adults who suffer from developmental delay, which can include a wide range of developmental disabilities from mental retardation, autism, cerebral palsy and fetal alcohol syndrome. The center's four wings will house specific activities dedicated to diagnosis and therapy, intervention and education, recreation and research and development.

"Our successes come one at a time and are very personal to us at the institute," Zahler said. "Our reward is the laughter of children whose burden we have lightened and whose struggle to cope with their personal disaster has been lessened."

The Oklahoma Benedictine Institute Child Development Center, predecessor to the institute, was established in 1974 at St. Gregory's Abbey.

"His center has been there as long as I've been in Tecumseh," said state Auditor and Inspector Cliff Scott. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Proposed New Center Would Help Developmentally Handicapped Kids
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.